(1262) Donut wages in the sprawl

Not surprising that a truly inescapable structural feature of the sprawl around us is now closely and directly associated with what this blog has been on about, and in a very public way.  In all their brown brick glory Tim Hortons outlets are usually located with predictability, outside the malls anyway.  Timmy H’s are most often found at a major intersection with commercial/industrial zoning nearby and a twelve pump gas station out front.  Cars are everywhere, six for every last Dutchie it would seem.  Lined up around the building and into the street sometimes, idling as their owners anticipate a hit of caffeine and sugar from the little sliding bay windows at the side.  With lots of parking and cars grinding or flying by depending on the time of day we have never found these outlets pedestrian or bike friendly.  They can be a challenge in a car.
There’s hostility inside the doors, too.  The product is popular enough but we mean all the people working hard for too little money day and night.  Like other corporate employers Tim’s has gotten riled up at having to pay living wages this month.  Pathologically selfish franchisees and the rationalizers at corporate office are now stuck with the label of tip stealer, benefits gouger and paid break abolisher.  How’s that for some great publicity?  This pooh-sandwich is slick corporate talent in action?
A few pennies passed on to the customer would have avoided shareholder nightmare ka-ka like this: #boycottTimHortons
Timmy Ho’s you rock!
Tim Hortons can tug heartstrings, but it must also do right by its workers
thestar.com
The biggest right-wing myths about raising the minimum wage, debunked. The combined weight of research, history, and economic expertise shows that giving low-wage workers a raise is a net positive
pressprogress.ca
Why Tim Hortons doesn’t deserve your sympathy
tvo.org
‘I was furious’: One man’s stand against Tim Hortons, a brand in crisis
metronew.ca
Tim Hortons controversy shows Canadians are ‘addicted to a low-wage economy,’ says author
cbc.ca/radio/as-it-happens

Image: Corey Buffet via Flickr/CC

(1261) Bomb Cyclone: an indoors poverty reading list


To keep you out of harm’s way should recent weather warnings turn out not to be exaggerations – some features about having the kinds of communities we’d like to have.
Media get it wrong on Bank of Canada minimum wage study
rozkowski.org
The places that may never recover from the recession.
The Rust Belt isn’t the only region left behind by the economic recovery. The suburbs of the American west are struggling, too
citylab.com
In defence of degrowth
counterpunch.org
The next financial crisis will be worse than the last one
truthdig.com
Any shame around poverty lies with the society that perpetuates it, not the poor
trhuth-out.org
Where you live should not harm your health
acto.ca
Poor neighbourhoods make the best investments
strongtowns.org
image: via Flickr/CC

 

(1259) Please sir, can I have another?


Going by Twitter alone it looks like the first big Canadian corp to shoot itself in the head over the recent increase in the Ontario minimum wage is that inescapable coffee chain named after a hockey player who died driving drunk in the 1970s.  Maybe jacking up the nation’s blood sugar every morning is harder than it looks?
Tim Hortons heirs cut paid breaks and worker benefits after minimum wage hike, employees say
cbc.ca/news
image: Mary Crandall via Flickr/CC

(1258) CEOS 2018 blowout


Before lunch yesterday the top 100 or so members of the executive class would have blown past the yearly average pay for a Canadian worker.  Through the cost to the public of goods and services we pay for this.
Just like last year…
It’s official: Canada’s richest CEOs pocketed the average worker’s annual income before lunch today. Are Canada’s high-rolling corporate bosses really 209 times more valuable than the rest of us?
pressprogress.ca
image: Vlad Podvorny via Flickr/CC

(1257) Surrey tent city

Who are we kidding?  This country is one of the great headless monsters of neoliberal capitalism.  High priced real estate opportunities and a view of the mountains for some.  Tent city for others.
‘From living to existing’: Tent city doubles in size in BC’s ‘other’ Downtown Eastside. In Surrey, a sprawling tent city is now home to over 130 occupants. The province is finalizing plans to build 150 modular housing units. Will it be enough?
nationalpest.com

 

(1255) Bread rip off


Major grocery chain owned by rich people.  Fixes price of bread for fourteen years.  Self determines a day of reckoning via gift card handout. Lawsuit arrives just in time.
Anti-poverty activist files $1 billion class-action lawsuit over bread price-fixing scheme. Irene Breckon of Elliot Lake, Ont., ‘outraged’ after Loblaw offered $25 gift card
thestar.com
Weston exposes utter hypocrisy
thestar.com
image: rpavich via Flickr/CC