(165) Ontario Common Front [Report]

Labour Day long weekend is upon us and most of the population of the province of Ontario will pile onto the 400-series highways.  A crush of motor vehicles bookends the final days of summer for those with access to lakes, cottages, boating and so forth.  Such privileges are meant to be enjoyed and Ontario, especially its densely populated southern parts, has been a busy province these past six or so decades.  The economic statistics for Canada’s largest province are staggering, 12.8 million people crank it out to the tune of over 600 billion dollars a year.  A shade more GDP than Sweden.  That makes Ontario the 25th largest economic unit by GDP in the world and the source of 40% of the Canadian economy.  All the more depressing then to come across another negative report about poverty and inequality and threats to the standard of living in Ontario.  A place that built 2.1 million automobiles in 2011, many for export all over the world.
A couple of days ago Ontario Common Front (see their Facebook page) released a report placing Ontario at the bottom of the list for social program spending, access to programs and support for public services.  Education, health care and the affordability of housing are also examined and found problematic.  We can’t think of anything directly related to the standard of living and quality of life of the population here that has been left out.  Something like 100 labour groups are part of this organization and the report is dense with worrisome statistics.  In turn, we fear it will get too little media attention as Ontarians enjoy their last weekend of the summer, and begin to think about sending children back to school.  Nonetheless, an election is coming.  One in which a reasonable centrist government will come under attack by eager neo-conservative/neo-liberal forces.  Perhaps this report will be a wake up call to all concerned?  National news outlets and most provincial newspapers with an online presence have picked it up.

Falling Behind: Ontario’s Backslide Into Widening Inequality, Growing Poverty and Cuts to Social Programs weareontario.ca

image: Wikimedia Commons
statistics: internet