(205) Our own backyard

Mississauga, the muscular central-westerly expanse of the Greater Toronto Area, has been getting media of late.  Architecture critic and urbanist Christopher Hume of the Toronto Star wrote the other day that he felt as if Alberta begins on the Humber River.  Like others, Hume was reacting to the newness, the commerce, the construction, the hustle-and-bustle found where there was previously an unsatisfying incompleteness of place.  Even those deeply critical of Mississauga’s unimaginative planning and the cozy relationships found there between developers and city hall are taken aback at the sheer scale of things now.

As for the poverty, well, it’s pretty much always been there.  Mississauga is home to a fringe working class, many born Canadians not doing so hot and now joined by newcomers with their own difficulties.  Some new data is available and it got mention in the Mississauga News recently.  A publication primarily acting as a sleeve for advertising flyers is to be encouraged when it devotes even a few square centimetres to those not living in monster homes or ripping up and down Highway 10 in a Lexus SUV.  Cooksville and Malton are the two worst parts of Mississauga if you want to know where the poverty is in this sizeable slab of real estate.  Around the corner from this blog’s offices are neighbourhoods with child poverty rates of twenty and thirty per cent.

Malton, Cooksville among poorest communities

image: Ian Mutoo via Wikimedia Commons