Category Archives: link

(16) Metro Matters [podcast]


The working poor
and immigrants were drawn to suburbs and Edge Cites during the real estate boom.  After the crash, these groups are stranded in dispersed locations where social services and jobs tend to be thin on the ground.  Enormous stress is created for vulnerable people when, for example, they try to access food banks on foot or via public transit.  When they get to a resource they may then find it struggling for resources as well.  Rapid growth in suburbia during the boom often resulted in under-funding of social services or reliance on uneven private, charitable efforts.  The perception of poverty as an urban or inner city social ill also distorts responses and, like the Great Recession that sponsors so much of it, is not really going away fast.  This podcast is about 15 minutes and refers to recent Brookings findings.
Next American City » Metro Matters Podcast » The Suburban Poor: An Interview with Elizabeth Kneebone and Scott Allard.

(15) Tipping point: 2008 [The Atlantic Monthly]

It looks like 2008 was the tipping point for suburban poverty.  In that year of crashing global trade and high financial disaster awareness of suburban poverty started going mainstream.  It had always been there of course but joblessness, the mortgage bomb and the high cost of energy mean more people are sharing in it.  Media coverage of reports from the Brookings Institution and ongoing coverage of unemployment and foreclosures made for some grim reading for Americans.  The socio-economic and structural arrangements of suburban living appear to be contracting all over the United States and in other communities around the world.  One of the most substantial pieces representing this awareness of great change ran in The Atlantic Monthly in March of 2008.  This feature article shows just how timely and powerful good magazine journalism can be.  Required reading if you want to know where it’s all going.
The Next Slum? The subprime crisis is just the tip of the iceberg.
Fundamental changes in American life may turn today’s McMansions into tomorrow’s tenements.

(14) Social services & suburban poverty [Brookings paper & University of Chicago]

Brookings Institution has followed its earlier papers on suburban poverty with several worthy efforts.

Below is a link for downloading their October 2010 paper about the difficulties facing social services in suburbia after the economic crash of 2008.  Tough times in America for the working poor: with implications for understanding experiences in other countries including Canada and the UK.  The paper includes statistical evidence on reported incomes and includes ‘on-the-ground’ impressions from three major urban-suburban agglomerations.  Part of the ‘Metropolitan Opportunity’ series.
Suburban safety nets rely on relatively few social services organizations, and tend to stretch operations across much larger service delivery areas than their urban counter­parts.
This second link, to a University of Chicago page, includes video from one of the authors and some links to mainstream media coverage.
Poverty grows in suburbs, but social services don’t keep up

(13) Scotland the brave!

Some observers suggest that recent urban rioting in England is the subject of massive overplay in the global media.  Either way, the discussion of it seems hopelessly polarized.  Also noteworthy is the lack of disturbance in Glasgow, a city sadly known for some of the worst social conditions in the European Union.  The link below, to a BBC page, may be of interest.  Not for a minute do we think that the response to suburban poverty begins and ends with police crackdowns.  It seems that if the fun and games on the perimeter are ignored for a long, long time it festers until there is no other immediate option.
Glasgow gangs chose route to peace in face of tough crackdown: Strathclyde community project helps blighted housing estates in city’s east and north claim 50% cut in gang violence

(9) Another suburb living in the past: Nashville’s Brentwood

Nashville, TN from Wikimedia Commons/Terraprint


Usually
where there is a homeless population of any size there will appear at least one weekly charity newspaper sold by the homeless and focussing on that issue.  The idea is to restore some measure of positive socio-economic activity to the life of people in severe difficulty.  In Brentwood, a suburb of Nashville, the police have apparently cited individuals for selling a paper called The Contributor.  I thought they had a Constitution down there?

With a monthly circulation of about 115,000, The Contributor has more than twice the circulation of any other homeless paper in the U.S. and Canada…

(8) Child poverty soars in suburbs [2008 CAS report]


Children’s Aid Society of Toronto released a report at the end of 2008 that makes for alarming reading.  Really, child poverty is the worst kind.  It would seem that Canada is not exactly like some small Scandinavian country with zillions of Krona to spend on sensitively applied, boutique social programs.  Too bad if you live in suburban poverty, huh?

In areas such as Mississauga, Markham, Richmond Hill and Oakville, child poverty rates have soared since 1990, closing in on levels once isolated to downtown Toronto, says the report, which used census data from 2006.