Category Archives: link

(66) Las Vegas

Worrisome reading about Las Vegas, Nevada and poverty.  Probably the ultimate in suburban statements in its day, one has to wonder what kind of future this desert city has.  A near total dependency on motor vehicles, air conditioning and water from far away makes for some hair-raising possible futures.  Does it seem like the economy there is recovering in any way?  Will real estate values go up again?  Is it a matter of just waiting around for the next real estate boom?

Behind Las Vegas glitz and glamour: a dark city marred by poverty Guardian UK

(65) Humber College… lacking social knowledge

If gargoyles could vomit with disgust somebody would be hanging up buckets at Humber College’s Lakeshore campus next week.  The college, located in a converted Edwardian psychiatric hospital on the shore of Lake Ontario in Toronto, is hosting two eating contests.  This is a place of education that trains social service workers and community service workers.  Suburban-poverty.com thinks this is wrong in so many ways.  There are food banks in every corner of the GTA now and there are people experiencing starvation in the world beyond. What kind of signal does this send to low income students or young women experiencing eating disorders and to the world at large about Humber?  Why does the Humber Student Federation think it’s okay to put on this kind of event, supported by student fees?  This is just more evidence, written in all caps in a font called Frat Boy Idiot, of just how low the level of mindfulness, social consciousness, and general discussion of poverty and other issues can be.  Shame on you Humber if you go ahead with this.  A growing number of students object to the eating contests and hopefully they will be heard by management in time to kill them stone dead.  Even a gargoyle can figure this one out.

(60) Au contraire…

Copyright free image from Wikimedia

I was driving through Philly the other day and …blah, blah, blah, …poor people.

We thought it good form to find some content from the interwebs that contradicted our own take on the issue at hand lest we be judged smug, dismissive.  A semi-anonymous blog post from this summer fits the bill nicely and is linked to below.  It employs the relativity argument.  Not derived from Einstein’s view of the universe this is a technique beloved of those politically to the right.  A cross-comparison to global poverty is usually involved.  It is designed to shut down arguments about social policy in a developed country and is, in our experience, driven by fear, loathing and the lack of experience of life though it is usually presented as highly rational and objective.  Such positions on social matters remind us that the battle against poverty need be waged as much in middle and upper class brains as in government offices, clothing banks, soup kitchens and shelters.
Suburban poverty? The Burning Platform

(59) Everybody loses: the poverty game

SPENT is an online game in which the player does not blast away at a marauding zombie army, land on the Normandy beaches, fly a thirty million dollar attack drone or steal cars.  No, this game, which has been something of a cult hit, expects you to die trying at something infinitely more nasty and lethal: life on a wage of $9 an hour.
Lock and load and good luck with that one!
SPENT the game
SPENT, the Online Game About Surviving Poverty and Homelessness, Reaches Its Millionth Play and Invites Congress to Accept the Challenge article

(55) Unexpected Texas

When we started suburban-poverty.com we had no idea what we’d come across.  Texas has surprised us a little.  Perhaps because right wing presidential hopeful Perry hails from Texas the state is enjoying some extra profile in North American discourse.  It seems the economy is doing well in right wing terms: lots of new crap jobs, low taxes and so forth.  The state is also physically more or less on fire from one end to the other, has been a brutal series of global warming oranges and reds on the continental weather maps for some time now.  Here’s some more Texas consciousness for you:
Poverty in the suburbs looks different than urban models
Baptist Standard

(53) US 2010 census data

2010 Census data has come under analysis and it shows that the general US economy is not in the best of shape.  Curiously, the percentage rate of African American poverty is a just a tad lower than that for white Americans.  It’s hard to say off-the-cuff what this means but we see it’s enough to get this emerging downturn labelled in the mainstream media as ‘different this time’ and as a suburban recession/depression.
Welcome to the suburban depression CNBC