(14) Social services & suburban poverty [Brookings paper & University of Chicago]

Brookings Institution has followed its earlier papers on suburban poverty with several worthy efforts.

Below is a link for downloading their October 2010 paper about the difficulties facing social services in suburbia after the economic crash of 2008.  Tough times in America for the working poor: with implications for understanding experiences in other countries including Canada and the UK.  The paper includes statistical evidence on reported incomes and includes ‘on-the-ground’ impressions from three major urban-suburban agglomerations.  Part of the ‘Metropolitan Opportunity’ series.
Suburban safety nets rely on relatively few social services organizations, and tend to stretch operations across much larger service delivery areas than their urban counter­parts.
This second link, to a University of Chicago page, includes video from one of the authors and some links to mainstream media coverage.
Poverty grows in suburbs, but social services don’t keep up

(13) Scotland the brave!

Some observers suggest that recent urban rioting in England is the subject of massive overplay in the global media.  Either way, the discussion of it seems hopelessly polarized.  Also noteworthy is the lack of disturbance in Glasgow, a city sadly known for some of the worst social conditions in the European Union.  The link below, to a BBC page, may be of interest.  Not for a minute do we think that the response to suburban poverty begins and ends with police crackdowns.  It seems that if the fun and games on the perimeter are ignored for a long, long time it festers until there is no other immediate option.
Glasgow gangs chose route to peace in face of tough crackdown: Strathclyde community project helps blighted housing estates in city’s east and north claim 50% cut in gang violence

(9) Another suburb living in the past: Nashville’s Brentwood

Nashville, TN from Wikimedia Commons/Terraprint


Usually
where there is a homeless population of any size there will appear at least one weekly charity newspaper sold by the homeless and focussing on that issue.  The idea is to restore some measure of positive socio-economic activity to the life of people in severe difficulty.  In Brentwood, a suburb of Nashville, the police have apparently cited individuals for selling a paper called The Contributor.  I thought they had a Constitution down there?

With a monthly circulation of about 115,000, The Contributor has more than twice the circulation of any other homeless paper in the U.S. and Canada…

(8) Child poverty soars in suburbs [2008 CAS report]


Children’s Aid Society of Toronto released a report at the end of 2008 that makes for alarming reading.  Really, child poverty is the worst kind.  It would seem that Canada is not exactly like some small Scandinavian country with zillions of Krona to spend on sensitively applied, boutique social programs.  Too bad if you live in suburban poverty, huh?

In areas such as Mississauga, Markham, Richmond Hill and Oakville, child poverty rates have soared since 1990, closing in on levels once isolated to downtown Toronto, says the report, which used census data from 2006.

(6) Infographic: Vancouver

Downtown East Side normally leaps to mind when considering poverty in Vancouver, Canada’s Pacific Rim big city.  If you’ve ever seen that neighbourhood for yourself anytime in the last few decades then the reference is all too understandable.  Unfortunately, Vancouver is now seeing some of the movement of poverty that Toronto is.  In January, 2011 the Globe and Mail published a map detailing this change using Statistics Canada census data for 1971 and 2006.
Pockets of poverty are arising in the suburbs of Vancouver while prosperity is popping up in the DES