Tag Archives: Toronto

(181) Working poor in Toronto [Report]

Flag of Toronto
T is for Toronto

T is for ten dollars and twenty-five cents an hour
T is for “totally sucks”

…which it does when you try and get by on that, the minimum wage, there.  The fact Canada is a lucky country in many ways is all very nice but that should not be used  to dismiss the need to improve wages, reduce inequality, crack down on slum landlords and build better public transit in Toronto.

Metcalf Foundation study: working poor numbers way up in Toronto

photo: alexindigo via Wikimedia Commons

(153) Atlas of Suburbanisms

One of the editorial interns at suburban-poverty.com came across a fantastic resource today: The Atlas of Suburbanisms from Waterloo University.  Just getting to say a word like suburbanisms brings a joy to our hearts, …let alone the content!
The content is, of course, what’s important and as a tool for literacy in Canadian suburbia this site is powerful stuff.  The focus is Canada’s three largest urban-suburban agglomerations: Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver.  Other communities are also examined.  The information is timely, well presented.  The more we read, the more we look at the maps and tables and analysis the more impressed we are with this site.  Part of the problem of understanding suburban life lies in the difficulty of agreeing to the language to apply to it.  The Atlas of Suburbanisms takes us beyond this initial confusion, shows us what is there, …shows us ourselves!

Atlas of Suburbanisms

(146) It’s not where you live, it’s how you live

Neither urban or suburban: FallingwaterMaking a choice between suburban living and some other kind, or even choosing to see much difference between the two at all, has been a proposition since the suburbs were born.  Now, late in the day for cheap energy and E-Z money, the question is defined anew.  Recently political actors in Toronto expressed both sides of the question in a place where the suburbs and the city are, if anything, becoming more alike.  The amalgamation of the old downtown City of Toronto with its sprawlshed never really sat well with anybody and yet it seems the language for describing the differences between city and suburb is much weaker than it should be.

Raising children in the city vs the suburbs Huffington Post

Do the suburbs make you selfish? Time Business

(139) Toronto builds & builds

A lot of the change in the suburbs is driven by change in the city.  Toronto is among the five largest cities in North America and has a tower building boom going on that appears to outdo the others on the list combined.  The idea of finding a family home in the central city or the inner, older suburbs of Toronto seems to be rapidly becoming obsolete for all but the wealthiest people.  This brings Toronto into line with many other global cities where international financial muscle, physical geography, and high population growth rates shape life.  This type of change pushes working people outward.  The distance pushed goes up even more for those in social difficulty.

The ‘Manhattanization’ of Toronto will change family-housing dreams CBC

(130) Every day is poverty day

Destitution Day arrived June 7th.  The new D-Day is a tool of Social Planning Toronto designed to help Canada’s largest, richest, busiest city understand where it is at regarding poverty.  Put simply, this is the day a single person collecting social assistance runs out of money.  So, no, in case you were wondering Destitution Day is not generating a lot of happy talk or positive feeling.  The statistics about poverty contained in the report are pretty distressing.  It is said that nearly all the wards of the city contain the equivalent of a small town living in poverty, even the one’s with the highest incomes.  And yes, the suburbs are well represented.

Social Planning Toronto releases first-ever poverty profiles of the city’s 44 wards on Destitution Day Toronto Star

http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/

http://www.povertyfreetoronto.org/

(110) Inequality forum

LAMP has been a social services presence in Etobicoke for some time now and so it makes sense that they would help bring an Economic Inequality forum to Toronto’s west end.  The forum, one of three so far, is designed to get dialogue and action going in regard to the way societies like this one have just become giant machines for making the rich richer.  This is the considered, brainy, indoors, post-Occupy response I think a lot of us have been looking forward to seeing for a while now.   The suburban character of poverty, everything from aging highrises to the need for public transit spending, was fully acknowledged. Kay Blair, John Sewell and David Hulchanski spoke on behalf of the need to develop a broad popular agenda in favour of changing inequality.  The event was quite audience friendly and the reasonable array of ideas, the well-considered social awareness in evidence was a lovely contrast to the kind of reactive nonsense we hear from right wing critters in public office and in the media too often.
We told them so on their Facebook page!  They gave out some literature about inequality, gathered suggestions and the Etobicoke Guardian covered the event.  Hopefully this is going somewhere.

The next related event is at Metropolitan United Church on March 26.

Economic Inequality home page
Economic Inequality Facebook

(83) 1 MILLIONth TOWER

We don’t know if there are a million towers out there but certainly the reinforced concrete high rise apartment or condominium building is one of the most readily encountered artefacts of humanity and home to many, many people.  An example of one was used as the banner image for this blog.  The Toronto area alone is said to have about 2,000 large residential towers.  Although it is remarkably easy to come up with critiques of such buildings and their effect on human communities it is kinda tough to find anyone doing anything really meaningful to imagine better for them and their residents.  The documentary linked below, from Canada’s National Film Board, steps into the gap and asks a small group of high rise residents to imagine better.  You’d have to be one hard hearted human being not to feel something while watching this six minute documentary.

Also see (61) Flemo!

(71) Toronto 2025: when three unequals add up to 99%

Here’s a recent feature from the Toronto Star about inequality.  Written by J David Hulchanski, a university of Toronto social work academic, it notably takes up the language of the occupy movement.  That movement may fade a little as winter weather sets in but suburban-poverty.com feels it is now a full contributor to the general discourse in the United States and the United Kingdom.  In Canada it is not as developed.  Mixed feelings about the banks do exist here but there is a genuine sense that the regulatory environment and the corporate culture in banks here deserve some moral credit for keeping us a little more secure than elsewhere.
Don’t get us wrong, the fact Canadian banks didn’t deliver us unto a foreclosure crisis or help themselves to even more of our money in the form of direct bailouts should probably not be viewed as a major favour.  That goes double when you consider two more things.  Firstly, “our” banks have been drawing on a major piece of real estate, the second largest country in the world for two hundred years so they can afford to be well regulated and like it along the way.  Second, we bail them out indirectly every day in the form of transaction fees.  Suburban-poverty.com’s treasurer was aghast the other day to have an ATM screen inform him of a new $1 charge for printing a statement the size of a modest convenience store receipt.  All those “tips” add up, people.
Hulchanski’s article elaborates on an established concept, the emergence of three cities in the Greater Toronto Area.  Basically it’s about the death of the middle class.  Statistics, a graph and a map indicate the reality of suburban poverty in the fifth largest city in North America, Canada’s business capital and a vast area increasingly defined by, and living off of the avails of, suburban sprawl.
The 99% know all about inequality
[statistics for 1970 & 2005 – projections for 2025]

(65) Humber College… lacking social knowledge

If gargoyles could vomit with disgust somebody would be hanging up buckets at Humber College’s Lakeshore campus next week.  The college, located in a converted Edwardian psychiatric hospital on the shore of Lake Ontario in Toronto, is hosting two eating contests.  This is a place of education that trains social service workers and community service workers.  Suburban-poverty.com thinks this is wrong in so many ways.  There are food banks in every corner of the GTA now and there are people experiencing starvation in the world beyond. What kind of signal does this send to low income students or young women experiencing eating disorders and to the world at large about Humber?  Why does the Humber Student Federation think it’s okay to put on this kind of event, supported by student fees?  This is just more evidence, written in all caps in a font called Frat Boy Idiot, of just how low the level of mindfulness, social consciousness, and general discussion of poverty and other issues can be.  Shame on you Humber if you go ahead with this.  A growing number of students object to the eating contests and hopefully they will be heard by management in time to kill them stone dead.  Even a gargoyle can figure this one out.