(1129) May Day: pizzas & pink slips


May Day perhaps offers us a moment or two for thinking about the future of work and wages in years to come.
Also, robots.
The next big thing in construction robotics is building big.
Automation has revolutionized factory work. Now researchers have their sights set on construction
cbc.ca/news
Domino’s turns to robots to deliver pizza
robotics.news
Where machines could replace humans – and where they can’t (yet)
mckinsey.com

(1128) Discount grocery pay


Discount grocery stores exemplify the struggle to get by – on both sides of the cash register.

We should be paid a living wage’. Discount grocery store workers speak out against management, unions.  Food Basics say company and unions are not fighting enough for their rights
cbc.ca/news

A podcast with author Ellen Rupel Shell about the implications of low end retail.

The high cost of buying ‘cheap’
npr.org (2009 podcast 29:43)

image: rene_beignet via Flickr/CC

(1127) Aging in it


Three items to help us gather some thoughts around the growth in the number of elderly persons occurring now in North America.  How will the built environment affect the cognition and emotional life of seniors?
The isolation of aging in an auto-oriented place
strongtowns.org
No place to grow old. How Canadian suburbs can become age-friendly
irrp.org (26-page .pdf)
What helps Minnesota seniors age in place?
U researcher has some clues. It’s the little things
like benches and safe crosswalks
startribune.com
Who will buy Baby Boomers’ homes?
citylab.com
Want to stop your brain from getting old?
Live in a walkable neighbourhood
fastcompany.com
image: Tasha Lutek via Flickr/CC

(1125) Poverty as disease

This past weekend saw the international March for Science take place in something like 600 communities.  We can hardly think of anything as heartening as smart people the world over gathering for science.  Adhering to a theme of knowledge and objectivity is this piece from Nautilus.  Its author looks into the reality of living a life of deep uncertainty and stress.  We really urge you to read this one because it is starting to look like poverty doesn’t just deform personal behaviour and therefore lead us to injury.  Poverty can be increasingly seen as harmful to us at cellular and genetic levels and in our body chemistry.  An understanding of the science of poverty should allow us to stop attributing its existence of some combination of personal character and systemic inevitability and to rationally treating it.
Why poverty is like a disease. Emerging science is putting the lie to American meritocracy
See also: (372) Studies indicate poverty impairs cognitive ability