Tag Archives: Canada

(1244) Prosperity ranking


Canadians still count themselves lucky to have escaped much of the type of economic madness that came to afflict the United States after the 2008 crash.  Still, there seems to be some discomfort with the state of things here if the Legatum Institute’s Prosperity Index is to be believed.  This globally-focussed think tank praises Canada frequently, placing us at number eight this year with Yemen dead last and Norway number one, after assessing a range of socio economic factors.  This index is picked up quite widely in the business media most years and it appears to contain much general truth.
Prosperity ranking slips to 2007 level: index weighs Canadians’ outlook on financial and societal factors
thestar.com

(1238) Adult workforce participation


News that half of Canadians in their prime working years don’t have a full time permanent job is a bit of a puzzle.  Consider this against the central place in this culture occupied by the folklore of occupations and work, status and wages, the entire socioeconomic package of Canadian life.

Census 2016: Canadians in prime working years less likely to hold full-time jobs
theglobeandmail.com

image: aldisley via Flickr/CC

(1235) Industry Street

Daniel Rotszstain wrote recently about the way several non-profit agencies have arranged themselves in what was once a manufacturing area in Toronto.  They can’t afford the central city and there’s needs in the older suburbs.
Urban planners: please pay attention to this.
How a strip of warehouses became a community hub.
Low rents and large buildings have drawn not-for-profit organizations and new life to Industry Street in the former
city of York
theglobeandmail.com

(1234) On the lighter side…


”Action is what matters.” -Gene Simmons, 2017

Two comic efforts at understanding North American economic reality brought some laffs to the suburban-poverty.com bunker complex this week.  Unintentionally hilarious, but no less instructive for that, is a hot new self help book from KISS front man Gene Simmons. The second, a sharp strike from Rick Mercer.
To understand Gene’s book, picture an elevator shaft as black as On Power’s faux leather cover at the bottom.  Ayn Rand chugs a mickey of rye whiskey on an empty stomache, takes two or three hits off a crack pipe and tosses herself down the elevator shaft.
Mercer’s rant about Ontario’s coming move to a higher minimum wage is a little more to our liking.  Together, the two efforts tackle powerful myths about life here.
editor’s note: let’s give Gene props for urging us to read books and self educate.  He’s right, there are no excuses when all the knowledge of the world is available to us on the screens in our hands.