Tag Archives: economic conditions

(1064) Productive Canadians need a raise [CSLS report]

csls-report-cover
Merit is supposed to be one of the anchor concepts of modern economics.  A good product, for example, merits sales, a smart lawyer merits his fees, and so on.  Why aren’t we productive Canadians getting a nicer hit on payday, then?  Our productivity is up but the Centre for the Study of Living Standards finds that we aren’t really being rewarded for that.  Wages have risen more slowly over time than our productivity.  Have we changed our tune on merit?
Labour productivity and the distribution of real earnings in Canada, 1976-2014 (45-page .pdf file)
csls.ca

(1050) Precariousness as policy

quiet signage
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives produces Policy Notes as a reinforcement and alternative to its longer reports.  This recent one from the BC office looks in at a topic well in the precinct of anyone concerned with suburban poverty.
If precarious employment is the new normal, how come we’re not talking about it?
…well, at least a federal minister is talking at us about precariousness, nay he appears to be advocating it.
Finance Minister says Canadians should get used to short-term employment. Calling it ‘job churn,’ Minister Bill Morneau told Niagara Falls crowd to expect a number of career changes in a person’s life
metronews.ca
image: Lefteris Heretakis via Flickr/CC

(1005) Housing picture

red houseNobody seems to be an expert when it comes to calling the relative burstiness of Canada’s housing bubble.  And what a bubble it’s been!  Pretty much all of us can agree, however, that the bubble has a harmful side now.  The cost of acquiring and carrying real estate departed the company of Canadian wages a generation ago in Toronto and Vancouver.  Rents have been forced up by the bubble, reinforcing the generalized prejudice of not owning what you live in. Overseas investors are amping up prices and eating supply.  What is to be done?  Some of us remain partial to real estate as a money machine and others are fed up with a machine that seems to exclude them.
Canada’s economy is hostage to the housing bubble. The debate over B.C.’s new tax on foreign buyers exposes how badly the Canadian economy needs ridiculously unsustainable house prices to keep rising
macleans.ca
Jean Swanson: Vancouver’s focus on home ownership neglects plight of the homeless
rabble.ca
Intensification nation. Canadian cities, big and small, are working to densify themselves. It’s far from a straightforward path
corporateknights.com

image: Bill Ward via Flickr/CC