Tag Archives: income

(1230) Tax havens & CASW statement on uBIG

This week we were reminded that the federal Liberal party’s bag men are no strangers to the benefits of stashing one’s money overseas.  Hey, even Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has a couple hundred pounds in that fancy hat.  Attention for the matter of how Canada’s elites array their money has, unfortunately, proved fleeting.
Also predictably disappointing was a near total lack of media interest in a statement from a professional body of Canadian social workers in favour of recent official interest in basic income.  Like other observers, the social workers have come to find Canada’s approach to the costly presence of poverty here less than effective.  Along with the experience of doctors and nurses, the knowledge of social workers has to be considered with high seriousness in this area.  Money stashed overseas in tax havens would seem to at least hint at the ability of this society to afford social policies that would eradicate poverty.
From safety net to stable foundation: CASW recommends a universal basic income
casw-acts.ca (with links to 2014 & 2015 papers on inequality that consider UBI)
Paradise Papers underscore need for tax justice
rabble.ca
Queen Elizabeth II has $13M in investments in offshore tax havens: documents
global.ca
How will governments solve the tax haven riddle? Offshore tax havens cost us all billions, but cracking down on them is like a game of whack-a-mole, writes the Star’s Marco Chown Oved in an analysis following the Paradise Papers leak
thestar.com

(1228) GTA income & equality update

For low income neighbourhoods to increase from 9% of a place to  51% of a place is a pretty crap reality.  Welcome to Brampton and Mississauga, once showpieces of growth and consumer choice.  Really, if you know anything about social conditions here the update to a 2015 United Way report will not surprise you.
Toronto region becoming more divided along income lines
thestar.com
And oh boy, the reports are never in short supply for long.  From late September: word about older citizens and others in food difficulty.
Who’s Hungry in Our City? 2017
North York Harvest & Daily Bread Food Bank
Not working isn’t the cause of all this.  In case you were wondering about 60% of those in poverty in Canada are in work.
Canadians for Public Justice 2017 Poverty Trends
cpj.ca

(1220) Ontario basic income challenges


Ontario’s basic income pilot program moves forward and real world details accumulate about it.  This is the hard work part, turning a theoretical schema into a reality.
Again, with variations of this hideous term ‘free money’ which The Star ought to know better than to use because it is so biased towards the right leaning critique of basic income.
Handing out money for free harder than it looks. Ontario began issuing basic income cheques in July, but reaching eligible participants has been a challenge
thestar.com

(1205) Stress is all that’s holding us together


A squeeze is on working people in the United Kingdom, the States and Canada.  The calculus of personal pressure and hard times described in this piece from The Guardian website is certainly reproduced in the Greater Toronto Area.  Such difficulty seems to be a big part of what it means to be a working person in these societies.  Mentioned in this piece is the weak economics of wages for a couple with a young child in Glasgow where a call-centre job really just doesn’t cut it.  The weight of this at the societal level is also discovered via this article.  Recent data from a UK university is linked concluding a crap job is often much worse for your mental health than the stresses of full on unemployment.
Crazy stuff indeed.  The late nineteenth century industrial economy was fuelled on coal.  Our early twenty-first century digital economy is fuelled on human stress.
The stress of low-paid work is making our country sick
Having a bad job can be worse for your health than being unemployed
manchester.ac.uk
image: Flood G. via Flickr/CC

(1196) Unequal Ontario [CCPA report]


Ontario needs to find a better balance when it comes to wages and economic relationships.  A new report finds richer Ontarians doing well while their low income neighbours keep sliding.
Labour market doing ‘no favours’ for low income families
thestar.com
Poor Ontario families getting poorer. New research says bottom half of families in Ontario are earning less, while richer families earn more
cbc.ca/news
Ontario’s middle and working class families are losing ground
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – links to 32-page .pdf file
Minimum wage hike needed as half of Ontarians see wages shrink
huffingtonpost.ca
Ontario minimum wage increase good for workers and business: economist
bnn.ca (video 8:14)