Tag Archives: psychological aspects

(1004) Grinding around the GTA

subway doors
Maybe having a not-so-great-job and travelling to it via public transit is something a lot of us are kinda destined to get stuck with.  Life isn’t always fair.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t do a fair bit better than what transit riders described to Torontoist recently.  The experience of being a second class citizen is acquired in layers and getting to work here is increasingly an encounter with such a layer.
How riding the TTC has affected my mental  health
torontoist.com
See also:
(974) Way too long for too little: complex & expensive trips to work [Study]

image: Andy Nystrom via Flickr/CC

(1002) Don T & US child poverty

Donald Trump billboard
We keep hearing about all this generalized American anger.  Swathes of the population there are feeling filthy about the way things have turned out after decades of neoconservative nonsense from both sides of a two-party federal system.  This generalized anger in turn explains the success of Mr. Orangeface Clownpants.  Trump has been able to say pretty much any nasty-ass thing he wants to say and still get ahead because of the funk and fury the American voter has sunk into and seethes with respectively.  Rage serves to peg in place political illiteracy these days.  Hillary Clinton offers herself as the calming Mommy to the tantrum-throwing voter and so she benefits from the unfocused rage as well.
So, how about you Americans focus a little.  Dare we even suggest an apoplectic unity on behalf of the children who will someday inherit your republic?  A good starting point would be this kick in the head of a paper from March this year.  Half of all children in America are in poverty or pretty damn near it.  Half of them!  What does the lackluster alumni of US federal political party leadership have to say about this topic during the weirdest of elections ever?  Looks to be pretty much nothing.
Poverty and child health in the United States
(abstract & link to .pdf file)
Council on Community Pediatrics
Why facts don’t matter to Trump’s supporters
washingtonpost.com

image: Thomas Hawk via Flickr/CC

(947) Excuse me kind sir, WFPIT?

aaaaaaarobfordTime for a new text messaging acronym, yah?
How about WFPIT?
What Fucking Planet Is This?
A certain amount of emotionalism and a whole lot of media drivel was to be expected from the passing of Rob Ford.  Indeed, we have that, layered as it should be, over an acknowledgment that his family’s (ongoing) pain is quite real.  Even for us reading the media output after the big man’s passing from cancer has been pretty awful stuff.   The combination of North America’s aspirational culture with the political illiteracy of the masses offers us one of its most  disturbing manifestations in the career of Rob Ford.
We like these three items because they offer considered perspectives on Ford and Ford Nation.
Rob Ford, 1969-2016: a legacy he never intended
spacing.ca
Andray Domise: the Rob Ford legacy that many refuse to confront
tvo.org
An honest assessment of Rob Ford’s legacy. Rob Ford’s impact on the city includes harm inflicted on some of the city’s most marginalized residents, and a worsened political discourse. We shouldn’t forget this
torontoist.com
Click here for Rob Ford-related articles aggregated on suburban-poverty.com

(946) Somebody at least look their way

USA flagA strong piece in The Guardian asks readers to consider an  underassessed socio-economic group.  Please recommend this one to others trying to understand Donald Trump and the politics of decline and social disaster in the United States.  Millions have fallen from a racial/class group that was once a staple presence in American politics into the kind of social difficulty known by millions of African Americans.
Canadians, you may include this on a reading list, one that aims to help you understand Ford Nation (and you maybe best get moving on that shit, folks).
Mocked and forgotten. Who will speak for the American white working class?

image: Andrew via Flickr/CC