Tag Archives: public transit

(940) Airport employment hub

Pearson ConnectsLester B Pearson airport is Toronto’s second largest employment hub.  Makes sense, the huge and purposeful sky harbour serving the nation’s biggest city and business capital is ringed with a vast area of commercial and industrial property.  Traffic can be out of this world.
This kind of economic engine should be a high priority for advanced public transit projects.  In place of such nice things we find some of the heaviest traffic in North America.  Obviously, much of the driving to the airport is done by working people.  Substituting a goodly portion of their car rides with trips on high order public transit makes sense for all the right reasons (reducing air pollution, road crowding, and accidents, easing demand on parking supply, and reducing the personal costs of motoring).  All these things and more are the subject of a new report from the Greater Toronto Airport Authority.  At least two other reports have dealt with this topic and there are links to them in this Toronto Star piece.  Looks like it’s time to show some ambition on this file.
Airport area employers look for a better way. GTAA report makes the case for better transit to the GTA’s second-biggest jobs hub
Pearson connects: a multi-modal platform for prosperity
GTAA report
18-page .pdf

(895) Atlanta trek

15700195924_f1987312b6_zOnce you’ve actually done this kind of wearing, multi-hour, multi-modal trek you have an idea how awful they can be.  In the last of a four-part series on the US south join an Atlanta woman making her way from a homeless shelter to a potential employer.  Two hours one way for the possibility of a job.  As a daily commute covering that kind of ground would be a job in itself.

A lonely road. For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty
washingtonpost.com

See also: (732) Long ride home

image: CTA Web via Flickr/CC

(779) Time and distance

5939753259_950d3650e2_z
Three
pieces from US media sources this month to highlight the relationship between your status and your ability to get around.

Stranded: how America’s failing public transportation increases Inequality. The nation’s crumbling infrastructure makes it hard for those living in poverty to access jobs, quality groceries, and good schools
atlantic.com

The hell of being carless in America’s suburban sprawl
talkingpointsmemo.com

Report says transit times extra long for people of color
startribune.com (Minnesota)

image: Robert Huffstutter via Flickr/CC

(774) Riding out of poverty

12279100464_8f1ab28150_zA buzz developed in the suburban-poverty.com office the other day when we came across mention of recent reports from Harvard and New York University linking transportation and poverty.  Difficulty with transportation is a major barrier to leaving poverty and exacerbates its effects.  One of the recurring themes of the material aggregated on this blog is the frustration heaped on the working poor and underemployed by the need to cover significant distances to get to work.  Better transportation, especially rail-based public transit, should help lift the time/distance burden imposed on low income workers.  We also need to keep getting our heads around planning communities so we can walk and bike to work.  We’ve known this intuitively for decades and many jurisdictions are making great strides in these two directions.

Transportation emerges as crucial to escaping poverty
nytimes.com

image: Glen Beltz via Flickr/CC

(752) Serious spatial mismatches

clockFour, five and six hours of commuting is crazy.

Why Americans live farther from work than they did a decade ago. A new Brookings report finds that jobs have sprawled outside city centers and away from poor and minority suburbs
Atlantic CITYLAB

Long commute to Silicon Valley increasingly the norm for many
KQED News (video 3:42)

Suburbs such as Montgomery County rethink transit to court millennials
washingtonpost.com


(746) New Haven [Report]

CTFrom Greater New Haven, Connecticut a strong report about “…a system that leaves the poor and unemployed unable to move forward.”

Transportation barriers to employment. How transportation problems keep people out of the workforce in Greater New Haven. A report by the Greater New Haven Job Access and Transportation Working Group
12-page .pdf file
Community Foundation for Greater New Haven

image: CT bus by Ken via Flickr/CC