Tag Archives: wages

(1234) On the lighter side…


”Action is what matters.” -Gene Simmons, 2017

Two comic efforts at understanding North American economic reality brought some laffs to the suburban-poverty.com bunker complex this week.  Unintentionally hilarious, but no less instructive for that, is a hot new self help book from KISS front man Gene Simmons. The second, a sharp strike from Rick Mercer.
To understand Gene’s book, picture an elevator shaft as black as On Power’s faux leather cover at the bottom.  Ayn Rand chugs a mickey of rye whiskey on an empty stomache, takes two or three hits off a crack pipe and tosses herself down the elevator shaft.
Mercer’s rant about Ontario’s coming move to a higher minimum wage is a little more to our liking.  Together, the two efforts tackle powerful myths about life here.
editor’s note: let’s give Gene props for urging us to read books and self educate.  He’s right, there are no excuses when all the knowledge of the world is available to us on the screens in our hands.

(1223) Edwardian Toronto


Toronto’s Edwardian past is still here in much of the street grid and through older built structures.  Unfortunately, you could say the way many a Torontonian lives right now is Edwardian.
Minimum-wage earners in Toronto do not make enough money to thrive. Report finds that residents need more than double what they earn on minimum wage, and that social policies need to be adjusted to meet the needs to present-day society
image: Daniel Varas via Flickr/CC

 

(1190) Loblaws wages


Why don’t big biz bosses look on paying living wages as one of the challenges of being in business?  You know, instead of something to carp about.  Why can’t our corporate commanders set living wages as a high level objective, apply the needed thought, creativity and resources and, well, just do it?  Or, is it that they just don’t like the idea of living wages to begin with?
Galen Weston knows paying a living wage is bad for capitalism. A full-time minimum wage worker takes home $25,877. In Toronto where rent averages $2,000 a month, that means living in poverty
torontoist.com
image: vintage ad from Jamie via Flickr/CC

(1173) Australia minimum


Australia’s minimum wage has risen by an amount just ahead of inflation and so is now $18.29 per hour.  Living wage territory, just about.
One hundred Australian dollars is worth one hundred Canadian dollars and six cents, by way of comparison.  This feature discusses the increase from several angles, most of which will be familiar to Canadians.
Fair Work Commission rules minimum wage to rise by $22 a week
smh.com.au
Shrewd businesses support $15 minimum wage and decent work
thestar.com

(1157) Economists on minimum wage hike


Where has this crew been all these austere years?  Dozens of Canadian academic economists and experts sign an open letter in support of Ontario plan to increase minimum wage to fifteen dollars per hour in 2019.
Minimum wage hike won’t bring ‘doom and gloom,’ economists say
thestar.com
Maybe a basic income will be up next for Ontario?   Either way, nice reading compared to the likes of this from Missouri:
Missouri set to reduce St. Louis minimum wage from $10 to $7.70
nydailynews.com
image: Paul Sableman via Flickr/CC

(1143) Citizen psychology


If the poor are less likely to vote then they won’t do much to advocate for themselves in the form of activism, letter writing or calling elected representatives either, will they?
In Ontario there is an opportunity to lift up the status of the working poor.  This is a moment when a push from the electorate could make a difference.
Advocates: Ontario plan to overhaul labour laws, boost minimum wage step in the right direction. Labour advocates applaud sweeping labour reforms and Ontario’s plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, but say it needs to happen soon
metronews.ca
Ontario to consider boosting minimum wage to $15, increasing paid sick days.
cbc.ca/news
UK-based academic research confirms what many have suspected for years; that low-income people have little faith in the system.
How poverty makes people less likely to vote. It is not surprising that so many of the poorest people choose not to vote. Theirs is not an act of apathy – for they are often intensely political – but of disgust
theguardian.com
image: duncan c via Flickr/CC