Tag Archives: economic conditions

(49) Downshifting might be fun after all

We came across this item this morning and thought we’d offer it up as an example of resiliency.  It’s about a family forced by economic circumstance to let go of their ideas of well off suburban living.  A lot of how they live would be familiar to generations past in that it involves conserving resources and doing without.  Carbon and other footprints seem to have been reduced in this reversal of the usual success story.  Giving up the American/Canadian/Australian/British suburban dream doesn’t have to mean failure, misery and a lack of joy.  Pretty soon we all might end up…
Living Right on the “Wrong” Side of Town

If this item interests you, ask at the library for a copy of No Impact Man by Colin Beavan.  There’s also a series of articles on the Guardian website about one Mark Boyle, a man living completely without money.

 

(47) No ride? No job!

Leaving core city areas for cheaper housing in the suburbs is one of the few strategies available to lower income people.  Thing is, when they get out to the suburbs public transit is scarce and car ownership sometimes mandatory.  The financial requirements of getting around,  especially reaching a workplace, could easily soak up any gains from the cheaper housing.

These two links are to short items on Wired blogs.  They mention a Brookings Institution report into the matter and a recent American civil rights conference which concluded that reasonable access to transportation is actually a human right.

Ever wait in snow up to your ankles for a bus at 5:30 in the morning?  Ever have the timing belt snap on a fifteen year old Honda Civic in an industrial park after getting off the afternoon shift?  If so, you know what it’s all about.

No public transit? No job…
Transportation as a civil rights issue

(37) Changeable arrangement?

The blog Infrastructurist published an interview in 2009 with Christopher Leinberger.  He has done quite a bit to bring the concept of suburban poverty to the mainstream.  Leinberger attributes much of the problem to supply and demand and to changing lifestyle expectations.  In other words, the magic of the market created the problem and will fix it.  Leinberger thinks it will take about thirty years for suburbia to adapt.  We love the sound of many of the adaptations required: walkable, mixed-use urban hubs and rail-based public transit for example.  He seems to be saying it’s a tall order but achieveable even if there will be losers along the way.  Perhaps this effort at structural adaptation could be put in place under government guidance as a response to what really does seem like the end of growth but a dissonance emerges right away.  A continental refitting of suburbia would require epic amounts of capital to start and maintain which makes Leinberger’s ideas seem almost hallucinatory given the impairments of the global financial system.  At a couple of points Leinberger indicates he is well in touch with reality.  He mentions the phenomenon of suburban houses converted into flophouses for groups of unrelated men.  Certainly, Leinberger’s efforts at the Brookings Institution also indicate much comprehension of suburban poverty and dysfunction.  His take on what to actually do with suburbia is both attractive and disappointing.
How to Save the Suburbs: Solutions from the Man Who Saw the Whole Thing Coming

(33) Gone sour-burbia

We thought it might be useful to look at popular culture for evidence of suburban poverty.  Much of what you come across in popular culture is aspirational, delusional even, when it comes to portraying class and social conditions.  Among the things we found is this resentful dirge from fringe Republican Hank Williams Junior.  The song refers to ‘this town’ but we see symbols and elements of suburban life. Williams croons from inside, or next to, a late 1950s Cadillac, there is a motor vehicle in every scene practically.  Single family dwellings and working people populate the video.  Things don’t look too hot – the repo man is after the pickup and there’s no work and apparently Williams paid taxes.  Awful to watch and awful to listen to.  A song and video like this is produced because nobody is living what it represents?  …more to come from popular culture!

(29) On top of it all: job sprawl

Next bus in forty-four minutes, or fifty-five minutes, except on Sundays or before seven a.m. or after rush hour, …or maybe never!  Typical scheduling for hard pressed working people dependant on Suburbland’s diesel bus dominated public transit.  It’s a wonder anyone can hold down a job in Sprawlville.  Long, multiple-transfer bus rides across Edge Cities in order to hold down some crap job suck the life out of you.  We’ve wondered about the justice of this for some time here at suburban-poverty.com.  Once again the Brookings Institution rides up with the evidence.  God bless Brookings!
Job sprawl and the suburbanization of poverty

Newspaper columnist Heather Mallick recently wrote with some passion about a proposed fare hike for Toronto Transit Commission users.  The TTC was once the envy of many a city but now is badly stressed, barely able to reconcile the urban and suburban needs of riders.  God bless you too, Heather!
Mallick: TTC fare hike like poison for the poor

editor’s note
: it once took us two hours and five minutes to get home from a gig cleaning cars in North York to our place in Parkdale.  We had early signs of hypothermia when we got in the door.  We have not harboured resentment ever since, fuckers.

(23) Shopping mauled

Out on the new, poorer frontier there’s at least one fun thing we can all bank on: dead shopping malls.  Perhaps along with zombie car dealerships and deep coma garden centres the malls will form a stock of adaptable, recyclable structures more suited to a post-cheap energy and post-high finance world?  Are you wagering that stash of gold bars and shot gun shells on it?  Didn’t think so.

Ghosts of shopping past photo gallery
Malls of a certain age audio link on page
“The enclosed mall itself, though, is as dead as your average big-city newspaper. Which is to say: not dead yet, exactly, but no one’s betting on its future.”
Dead Malls

(21) Rising inequality: OECD data

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development produces a host of data directly useful for assessing social conditions.  Do we need a supercomputer to connect rising inequality and the stacked economic gains of the rich with suburban poverty and downward mobility?

Notes for individual countries are found on the OECD site (.pdf files):

Better than many for a long time but no reason to be smug: Canada
Faltering after some improvement: United Kingdom
Forget it, only Turkey & Mexico are worse for income inequality: United States
Some improvement but could do better: Australia

(20) Can the middle class & the suburbs be saved?

The mass appearance of one begat the other and so we find the fate of the middle class and the fate of suburban life conjoined in a fashion that would have given Eng and Chang Bunker a good fright.  You could not have had one without the other.  Moving forward into the Long Emergency and a world of expensive petroleum, general resource depletion, traumatic economics, badly impaired credit/financial systems and shock doctrines we may end up losing much of both suburbia and its most loyal customers.  Leave it to The Atlantic Monthly to be a source of timely content for us yet again.
Can the Middle Class Be Saved?
“The Great Recession has accelerated the hollowing-out of the American middle class. And it has illuminated the widening divide between most of America and the super-rich. Both developments herald grave consequences. Here is how we can bridge the gap between us.”Atomic Weapon Test 1940s - Operation CrossroadsElizabeth Warren is an academic expert with a specialty in credit law and consumer debt/bankruptcy issues.  She was in the documentary Maxed Out and the link below takes you to a presentation she gave in 2008.  57 minutes that will open your eyes.  If you have the stomache for the details of the destruction of the middle class in America block out the time.  Seriously, this wonderful, articulate, compassionate and very smart woman should be the president of the USA, not that nice, utterly feckless Obama guy.
The coming collapse of the middle class
YouTube 57:38