(1125) Poverty as disease

This past weekend saw the international March for Science take place in something like 600 communities.  We can hardly think of anything as heartening as smart people the world over gathering for science.  Adhering to a theme of knowledge and objectivity is this piece from Nautilus.  Its author looks into the reality of living a life of deep uncertainty and stress.  We really urge you to read this one because it is starting to look like poverty doesn’t just deform personal behaviour and therefore lead us to injury.  Poverty can be increasingly seen as harmful to us at cellular and genetic levels and in our body chemistry.  An understanding of the science of poverty should allow us to stop attributing its existence of some combination of personal character and systemic inevitability and to rationally treating it.
Why poverty is like a disease. Emerging science is putting the lie to American meritocracy
See also: (372) Studies indicate poverty impairs cognitive ability

(1121) Basic Income [Book review]

Basic Income: How a Canadian Movement Could Change the World
Roderick Benns, 2016
Fireside Publishing House, Cambridge, ON
289 pages
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne’s announcement this morning of a three-community basic income pilot project would seem to move us happily to the forefront of one of the most interesting social policy developments in ages.  It also attaches some extra timeliness to an encounter with activist Roderick Benns’s book on the topic.
Basic Income is a compendium of interviews, short articles and Q&A sessions on basic income.  Benns supports a model based on a negative income tax in the amount of fifteen- to twenty-thousand dollars a year.  (The Ontario pilot looks set to utilize an amount of seventeen-thousand dollars annually)  A number of delivery models are possible for a basic income and the idea is to reform a patchy, outdated welfare system and place a minimum economic floor underneath all Canadians.  The book functions as an intellectual diary logging the upward curve of interest basic income has enjoyed in Canada (and globally) over the last two years.
Benns is a true believer in the nicest sense of the term.  His efforts are from the heart.  Basic Income is peppered with the names of patient activists and the high profile Canadian political figures being drawn to this topic.  Words from people in social difficulty describe how their lives might have been improved upon by a basic income and add some moral urgency to this policy matter.
Canadian mayors appear very frequently in Basic Income.  Their words lend this book, and the concept, great strength.  Mayors all over the country were canvassed by Benns in regard to a citizen’s income.  Many weighed in with full enthusiasm, providing supportive quotations based on direct community knowledge.  Indeed, the testimony of mayors from every corner of the country is the strongest component of this book.  The municipal level of government is the one closest to the daily lives of people and who better than mayors to advocate common sense approaches to poverty and hardship?
The age of Internet search engines makes the lack of a table of contents or index somewhat excusable.  The page at the end for further resources is a slim offering, however, considering the importance of social media and the Internet to activism.  Basic Income is very important for content over format, even if the latter could be improved upon cheaply and quickly, in our opinion.
Three years is the length of the basic income pilot confirmed today for Ontario.  Benns’s book offers readers a good tool for understanding and measuring this pilot and the progress of basic income around the world.  No doubt Benns will be watching closesly and sharing insights.
Buy his book and visit his online project: precariouswork.com
Giving more people an opportunity to get ahead and stay ahead.  Ontario basic income pilot to launch in Thunder Bay, Hamilton and Lindsay
news.ontario.ca
Want to end poverty? Let’s talk about a maximum income for Ontario. Anti-poverty groups handed out pamphlets outside RBC’s annual general meeting
torontoist.com

(1119) 5 signs of real estate mania

You know you are in a bubble when you are completely surrounded by people totally convinced you aren’t in a bubble.  Things seemed to be heating up in the late 1980s, but that’s nearly a generation ago now…
How Canada completely lost its mind over real estate
Canada’s totally out-of-control real estate market has now gone completely mad – and there’s no turning back
macleans.ca
(video 1:46 & numerous links)

Who’s to blame for Toronto’s housing crisis? This is a government policy problem. Taxes won’t fix this
ipolitics.ca

image: Correy Dantzler via Flickr/CC

(1118) Debating basic


Last week progressives held a public debate in Toronto on the matter of basic income.  Some of us think such a thing could stop poverty dead while helping us cope with automation.  It was great to see over two hundred people turn out for a live event on behalf of ideas and policies for a better society.  We are big on basic income here but heard powerful moments of caution from the negative side of the debate.
There is a fear that a basic income could be a poison chalice of sorts.  Austerity regimes might use the implementation of a basic income to sweep away what is left of the social contract.  An effective amount is required to prevent that.  Basic income also needs bolstering by other mechanisms that support social justice. That includes everything from good public transit to strong post-secondary education systems and more in between.  Basic income won’t work in a bubble.
Ontario embraces no-strings attached basic income experiment. Province to follow trail blazed by Manitoba in the mid-1970s with plan to lift people out of poverty with unconditional monthly payments
thestar.com
Don’t make ‘basic income’ an excuse for inaction: editorial
the star.com
Basic income is no silver bullet, but it may still save us
Debating what the government of Ontario’s pledged basic income pilot program will look like
torontoist.com