Tag Archives: political conditions

(82) Work, weapons, wars…

On, of all days, Remembrance Day, we came across a chart of the unemployment rate for US veterans under the age of 34 (i.e. Iraq & Afghanistan).  The chart is from Business Week online but suburban-poverty.com came across it on a blog called Global Guerrillas.  The latter concerns itself with geopolitical developments and the future of armed conflict.  How do we connect all that to suburban poverty?
The author at Global Guerrillas finds much to ponder as to how this unemployment may influence domestic conditions in the United States.  Is there reason to think these unemployed individuals may act in ways that are genuinely threatening to civil society?  Will they be exploited in a semiparalyzed, financially discombobulated political arena also increasingly full of incoherence and vehemence?  Even those only moderately literate in history find the mind racing to compare this prospect to the story of Weimar Germany, the short lived parliamentary republic (1919-1933) in which German totalitariansim was born.  Add Global Guerrillas to your blog reading list as you watch this part of the way things are developing in the United States.
Global Guerrillas:
Resilient communities and networked economies.  Open source insurgency and systems disruption.

(81) Death of the liberal class [Book review]

Suburbia could be said to have been a product of liberal values like redistribution of wealth, upward mobility, technological progress, public education, a merit-based system of economic rewards and rising standards of living.  Will it then die in the unfolding of the world as seen by Chris Hedges?  It’s a grim picture dear readers.  Hedges has given us a long, well written goodbye to liberals and their institutions.  What little is left of liberal values is seen as nothing more than a mask hiding corporate power and abuse.  We are two thirds finished this book and find it so powerful we decided to waste no time recommending it.  You have to be tough to make it through this one, though.  Hedges is describing a world gone to hell.  Politics and government, the arts, war, business, mass media, education, …nothing escapes.  Moral critique at its best, truly Hedges is a super-brained, seminary-schooled, war reporting version of Michael Moore.
All the more shame to CBC pseudo-journalist Kevin O’leary for his attempt to denigrate Hedges in October during an interview about the Occupy movement.  Imagine referring to a well-educated, heavily-published, Pulitzer-winning writer with a powerful sense of morality as someone who sounds like a “left wing nut job.”