Tag Archives: transportation

(120) No brakes!!!

With poverty, the fun just never stops.  Now, the automobile in North American popular culture is viewed as a great cultural leveller and class unifier.  Montreal’s Department of Public Health just spent four years looking at motor vehicle accidents and guess what they came up with?  The poorer your neighbourhood the more vehicular, pedestrian and cycling accidents take place and the more serious the nature of them.

“Gentlemen, start your engines!”

Wealth and traffic accidents: study shows poorer people many times more likely to be hurt

(109) Aging suburbia: assume the crash position!

One of suburban-poverty’s interns came to the office looking rather the worse for the wear today.  Apparently they could not sleep because of a night terror.  She was being driven across the suburbs by an octogenarian relative with very poor eyesight in a twenty-year-old old Nissan Pathfinder with a rusted out frame.  The driver couldn’t remember where anything was, and began mashing the gas and brakes on his V-6 engined nag in equal parts frustration with himself and rage at the price of gas.  Pothole after pothole  battered our poor intern into a queasy terror as the Pathfinder caromed off rotting curbs, felled a rusty lamp post and mangled a disused mailbox before arriving at the half dead mall beside the tent city.

What are we all to do when this nightmare becames reality?  Getting around is among the top one or two issues for suburbanites.  How old age improves on that issue we don’t know.  Readers may share our intern’s concern about the future of motorized suburban living.  Indeed, right now, a threat to the ability to drive about at whim would undermine the entire quality of life of possibly tens of millions of North Americans.  Particularly for the elderly, we worry about the future of car-dependent living arrangements.

On top of the weird economics of suburbia and the shortage of public transit out there in Toofartowalkland comes the aging of physical infrastructure interacting with the aging human bodily infrastructure of suburbia.   …assume the crash position, people!

Aging in the American suburbs: a changing population Aging Well Magazine

photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

(47) No ride? No job!

Leaving core city areas for cheaper housing in the suburbs is one of the few strategies available to lower income people.  Thing is, when they get out to the suburbs public transit is scarce and car ownership sometimes mandatory.  The financial requirements of getting around,  especially reaching a workplace, could easily soak up any gains from the cheaper housing.

These two links are to short items on Wired blogs.  They mention a Brookings Institution report into the matter and a recent American civil rights conference which concluded that reasonable access to transportation is actually a human right.

Ever wait in snow up to your ankles for a bus at 5:30 in the morning?  Ever have the timing belt snap on a fifteen year old Honda Civic in an industrial park after getting off the afternoon shift?  If so, you know what it’s all about.

No public transit? No job…
Transportation as a civil rights issue