Tag Archives: Atlanta

(1267) Airport homeless

If one thing could be said to symbolize the transition from the twentieth century to the present one it might be the tragic death of glamour in air travel.  Added now to the boring sorrows of security screening, economy seating, airline performance and global carbon footprints must surely be this phenomenon: homeless people living in airports.
Homeless fill Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport atrium overnight
myajc.com
image: Mark Goebel via Flickr/CC

(895) Atlanta trek

15700195924_f1987312b6_zOnce you’ve actually done this kind of wearing, multi-hour, multi-modal trek you have an idea how awful they can be.  In the last of a four-part series on the US south join an Atlanta woman making her way from a homeless shelter to a potential employer.  Two hours one way for the possibility of a job.  As a daily commute covering that kind of ground would be a job in itself.

A lonely road. For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty
washingtonpost.com

See also: (732) Long ride home

image: CTA Web via Flickr/CC

(711) Organized labour & the sprawl

 

Playing in the sandA fresh angle on the effect of built form on workers in this essay from Shelterforce.

Sprawl vs. unions. The three very different stories of the building trades in Atlanta, Denver, and Portland, Ore., show just how much urban development patterns affect workers

Sprawl is the most inconspicuous adversary of labor unions
nextcity.org

image: Andrei Dragusanu/Flickr

(490) Atlanta’s food deserts

Breakfast cerealHit by ice storms, high winds and heavy snow this winter Atlanta was seen to nearly grind to a halt at times.  The exceptional weather highlighted some worrisome things about life in that massively sprawled southern city: indicators of human risk built right into the general living arrangements there.  Low density, car-centric living in Atlanta doesn’t function particularly well for the poor on a sunny day.  Add in northern winter conditions and things get ugly.  Weak choices that overemphasize fast food and long treks for food in extreme weather are commonplace for low income Atlantans year round.  As the bad weather recedes the underlying vulnerability doesn’t and extremes of heat are also difficult.  A huge component of vulnerability year round is the area’s food deserts which are the subject of the Guardian piece linked below (which appears also in Atlanta Magazine).

Atlanta’s food deserts leave its poorest citizens stranded and struggling. It seems unthinkable but in a major US city, thousands cannot get to places where fresh, affordable food is available Guardian

The day we lost Atlanta. How 2 lousy inches of snow paralyzed a metro area of 6 million
Politico provided an excellent and widely read feature on the effect of January’s Icepocalypse on Atlanta’s vast sprawl

See also: (421) Let it snow

image: breakfast cereal by Zanastardust via Wikimedia Commons

(30) Free food

Here’s an interesting piece from the New York Times.  It’s about a woman who forages for food growing on foreclosed residential properties.  She boldy goes where no one can afford to live any more and finds peppers, melons, all kinds of things.  There’s something really cool about this sure sign of suburban contraction.  Lately, suburban-poverty.com has been scouting abandoned orchards and fruit trees, too.  We’re looking for a free crop to share with others, imperfect and organic-by-abandonment is fine with us.  We’ll do the work, too.

At vacant homes, foraging for fruit see slideshow as well