Tag Archives: Australia

(1173) Australia minimum


Australia’s minimum wage has risen by an amount just ahead of inflation and so is now $18.29 per hour.  Living wage territory, just about.
One hundred Australian dollars is worth one hundred Canadian dollars and six cents, by way of comparison.  This feature discusses the increase from several angles, most of which will be familiar to Canadians.
Fair Work Commission rules minimum wage to rise by $22 a week
smh.com.au
Shrewd businesses support $15 minimum wage and decent work
thestar.com

(758) Life expectancy & location in Australia [Report]

australiaNow and then we feel a certain concern for our perspective at suburban-poverty.com.  Poverty is serious stuff.  Are we maybe missing something, here?  Are we barking up the wrong tree? Do we apply a healthy skepticism to our point-of-view often enough?

Then we read stuff like this: data on life expectancy from Australia.

Living in the suburbs could take three years off your life. But it doesn’t have to. The further you are from your state’s parliament house, the more likely you are to be disadvantaged. But greater local control of policy can change all that
theguardian.com

(757) Australian private welfare doc

JobsAusThe stench of fraud wafts from Australia’s for-profit employment agencies according to the findings in a recent documentary. Really blatant stuff, too; based on forged signatures and big invoices for public money.  Australians in social difficulty are manipulated in the most rotten and cynical manner and they are not moved into employment.  The results are scandalous and shockingly expensive to the tune of billions of dollars.  We found this interesting watching.  Firstly, for the suburban location of interview subjects living in Elizabeth, near Adelaide.  More important, virtually identical systems turning the unemployed into a profitable commodity exist in the United States, Great Britain and Canada.

The Jobs Game
Australian Broadcasting Corporation – Four Corners – 45:25

(168) Gina Rhinehart

One thing about having a blog of one’s own is that you can say anything you want on it.  To wit: Gina Rinehart is a vile sack of dogshit.  Worth $30 billion dollars, the richest woman in the world, and all she can come up with is wage cuts?  No imagination whatsoever, …and this is supposed to be some great global era for business, for the art of deals, for entrepreneurship, for people like Gina.  Book shops are jammed with corporate histories, volume after volume about leadership and making money.  The language of business, free trade and supposed efficiency of markets dominates everything now.

So much privilege and opportunity at the top and this is all we get?

Gina Rinehart calls for Australian wage cut BBC

photo: NASA via Wikimedia Commons

(159) Suburban poverty and the brain

There goes the neighbourhood!Is it just us or does a diagram of the human brain look like a map of a suburban neighbourhood, replete with winding cul-de-sacs?  Perhaps, after a full year on the topic at hand, we simply need a vacation?  Not speculative, of course, is the general relationship between where a person is and how they feel.  Two items from Australia and one from Ireland indicate that depression is not just an economic term.

Depression surge in rich suburbs over cash worries: affluent areas see huge jump in demand for mental health services Independent.ie

Sick suburbs theage.com.au

What price a home? theage.com.au

 

(46) Feed Melbourne

The photo attached to the article linked below could have been taken in any of the English-speaking countries.  What a drag that is!  The fact that very large, resource-rich countries like Canada, Australia and the States see working people struggling with crap wages, a high cost of living and the threat of downward mobility is bad news.  I wonder if they have Dollarama down there?
FEED MELBOURNE: Hunger in our suburbs Diamond Valley Leader
Feed Melbourne Campaign

(21) Rising inequality: OECD data

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development produces a host of data directly useful for assessing social conditions.  Do we need a supercomputer to connect rising inequality and the stacked economic gains of the rich with suburban poverty and downward mobility?

Notes for individual countries are found on the OECD site (.pdf files):

Better than many for a long time but no reason to be smug: Canada
Faltering after some improvement: United Kingdom
Forget it, only Turkey & Mexico are worse for income inequality: United States
Some improvement but could do better: Australia