Tag Archives: Canada

(1010) Homeless & expecting

ph1
At one time, you could be forgiven for thinking of homelessness as mainly about men living rough and drinking.  By the 1980s the definition of homelessness was clearly more complex.  It seems just about anyone is at risk, including in Toronto in 2016, pregnant women.

Homeless and pregnant in Toronto: one woman tells her story. About 120 homeless women give birth in Toronto every year. The challenge is how to help them
cbc.ca

(1007) Bantustanada 2040

Vancouver MapCounterfactual propositions are most times best avoided.  We all are hungry for glimpses of the future, sure.  That part is okay.  There’s just too much risk of distraction in many a creative “what if” scenario, too much room for wild swings of positive or negative projection.  Let’s make an exception today for this dystopic reflection on an imagined socioeconomic existence for Vancouver, BC.  Yikes!  This can’t be a future anybody wants a part of.

How Vancouver’s housing segregation became policy: a 2040 look back. Decades from now, researchers reflect with shock, pity on what led to creation of regional, economically unequal ‘bantustans’
thetyee.ca

image: via basementgeographer.com – CC

 

 

(1005) Housing picture

red houseNobody seems to be an expert when it comes to calling the relative burstiness of Canada’s housing bubble.  And what a bubble it’s been!  Pretty much all of us can agree, however, that the bubble has a harmful side now.  The cost of acquiring and carrying real estate departed the company of Canadian wages a generation ago in Toronto and Vancouver.  Rents have been forced up by the bubble, reinforcing the generalized prejudice of not owning what you live in. Overseas investors are amping up prices and eating supply.  What is to be done?  Some of us remain partial to real estate as a money machine and others are fed up with a machine that seems to exclude them.
Canada’s economy is hostage to the housing bubble. The debate over B.C.’s new tax on foreign buyers exposes how badly the Canadian economy needs ridiculously unsustainable house prices to keep rising
macleans.ca
Jean Swanson: Vancouver’s focus on home ownership neglects plight of the homeless
rabble.ca
Intensification nation. Canadian cities, big and small, are working to densify themselves. It’s far from a straightforward path
corporateknights.com

image: Bill Ward via Flickr/CC

(1004) Grinding around the GTA

subway doors
Maybe having a not-so-great-job and travelling to it via public transit is something a lot of us are kinda destined to get stuck with.  Life isn’t always fair.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t do a fair bit better than what transit riders described to Torontoist recently.  The experience of being a second class citizen is acquired in layers and getting to work here is increasingly an encounter with such a layer.
How riding the TTC has affected my mental  health
torontoist.com
See also:
(974) Way too long for too little: complex & expensive trips to work [Study]

image: Andy Nystrom via Flickr/CC

(1001) Who’s city is this?

street scene
The world economy soars into the trillions these days with much of the focus on cities, on real estate.  We found reading this pair of items with our morning coffee in hand aided and abetted some understanding of the picture at high levels.  Wow, just imagine two hundred and seventy billion dollars worth of anything, then try and imagine a quadrillion dollars worth!
Investment in urban land is on the rise. We need to know who owns our cities
theconversation.com
Time to pay for the city we want
thestar.com

image: glassghost via Flickr/CC

(998) Toronto’s wealth gap [Study]

martinreportOh dear.  Mexico City, Dallas and Seattle have more inequality than Toronto.  We are a little higher on the inequality list than most of us may think.  We got right into the North American ill top four thanks to eight billionaires, a brace of other rich folk and Canada’s slackness on inheritance taxes.  Crazy returns on real estate probably also helped the one percenters.  We’re nineteenth globally.

The geography of the global super-rich 47-page .pdf file
Martin Prosperity Institute/University of Toronto

Toronto’s 1 per cent are about 100,000 times wealthier than us. Divide between Toronto’s rich and the rest of us among the biggest in the world
metronews.ca

 

(991) CBC feature: food mirage, food deserts

fooddesertOne of the top three or four most clicked-upon postings at suburban-poverty.com is (138) Left Coast Food Deserts from June of 2012.  Recent efforts at University of Winnipeg to fine tune the understanding of this phenomenon have just emerged.  Sprawl watchers may note the role driving a motor vehicle plays in helping define who lives in a food dessert.
Food mirages leave Canadians knocking on food bank doors. Food insecurity still a problem when available nutritious food sources aren’t affordable for many
cbc.ca – see other links