Tag Archives: Canada

(1285) Feckless Doug


Whatever your reaction to Doug Ford’s personality and speaking style he is probably best understood to be an advocate of neoliberalism.  Perhaps he’s for a tad more vigorous regime of that than Kathleen Wynn has been during her tenure.  Either way, a political change is imminent in Canada’s largest province and like voters all over the west for decades now we are confronted with a picked over buffet of options and must choose the least ptomaine-inducing one.
Remember to vote, friends and folks.  Above all, remember your interests.
Battle lines drawn over wages, jobs.  Low-wage work force has seen ranks grow rapidly, but parties differ over how to deal with it
thestar.com
image: Scazon via Flickr/CC

(1283) Women, prison & Canadian poverty


With perhaps a few fairly obvious exceptions there can hardly be many convincing arguments for putting women in prison in general and solitary confinement in particular.  Just think of the awful effects a sentence can have on the family life of women.  Statistics continue to tie gender, race, poverty and prison together in ways nobody should feel happy about.
Reduce the poverty-to-prison pipeline for women
huffingtonpost.ca
image: Michael Coghlan via Flickr/CC

(1274) Words from Ontario basic income trial


Ontario’s basic income pilot has begun to produce some observations and anecdotes.  A thorough, high level analysis will need to be done at the conclusion of the three-year, three-community trial but expectations are high.  The pilot project is not quite a full-on basic income, more of a test apparatus designed to gather evidence of what actually happens in the lives of a recipient.
Yes, there is still a fair bit of naysaying and skepticism out there.  Some of it from surprising directions like a major anti-poverty activist here in Ontario and from union figures.  Another hurdle may be the upcoming provincial election.  All kinds of right wing critters and neoliberal reactionaries are looking for power, for gravy trains to stop, as it were.  The pilot project may be an early target in the election and for whoever gets into the premier’s office.  In the meantime, words from the participants are appropriate.
From ‘barely surviving’ to thriving: Ontario basic income recipients report less stress, better health. The three-year pilot project, which began last summer, is testing whether no-strings-attached cash support can boost health, education and housing for people living in poverty
thestar.com
image: Hefin Owen via Flickr/CC

(1273) A sharper Canada


Note to Canada: sharpen your game up a little.
This first piece might go some way to explaining the whacky prices for real estate in Vancouver and Toronto.  Ouch!
How Canada became an offshore destination for ‘snow washing’. The country’s opaque jurisdictions allow owners of private companies to remain anonymous and the firms to remain in the shadows
theguardian.com
Do corporate officers really need us to hand them $200m worth of deductions for their entertainment expenses every year?  Nope.  And that’s just for starters, a handful of loopholes are costing the public vast sums.
These tax loopholes for the rich cost Canada billions. Here’s how we could invest that money instead. What could Canada do with $12 billion lost to tax loopholes exploited by corporations and wealthy elites?
pressprogress.ca
image: Alex Indigo via Flickr/CC

(1264) Sears & loathing in Davos


The work of folding slacks, swiping credit cards and stocking shelves was enough to keep Sears going in Canada as a profitable, dividend-paying and executive bonus-giving retailer for decades.  Then management decided to pack it all in.  Emperor Justinian, representing us at Davos, seems to think it’s all pretty much okay, including the company leaving behind a whopper of a deficit in its pension plan.
Will 16,000 Sears Canada retirees see their pensions?
thespec.com
Trudeau suggests EI for Sears workers who risk losing pensions
huffingtonpost.ca
Image: Mike Kalasnik via Flickr/CC