Tag Archives: economic aspects

(1313) Class Canada

Back to class, not just for the future workers, heads of families, homebuyers and consumers either. It’s always been about class, kids. Two thought pieces from the Canadian media on a topic they would much prefer to ignore most days. A long one and a short one, both on point.

It’s not an ‘affordability crisis’, it’s a class conflict

thestar.com

What does it mean to be working class in Canada? Socio-economic lines are often erased or ignored in Canada. Here’s how I came to see my working class roots clearly
macleans.com

image: Elena Centor via Flickr/CC

(1273) A sharper Canada


Note to Canada: sharpen your game up a little.
This first piece might go some way to explaining the whacky prices for real estate in Vancouver and Toronto.  Ouch!
How Canada became an offshore destination for ‘snow washing’. The country’s opaque jurisdictions allow owners of private companies to remain anonymous and the firms to remain in the shadows
theguardian.com
Do corporate officers really need us to hand them $200m worth of deductions for their entertainment expenses every year?  Nope.  And that’s just for starters, a handful of loopholes are costing the public vast sums.
These tax loopholes for the rich cost Canada billions. Here’s how we could invest that money instead. What could Canada do with $12 billion lost to tax loopholes exploited by corporations and wealthy elites?
pressprogress.ca
image: Alex Indigo via Flickr/CC

(1218) Merging out of it?


Amalgamating urban/suburban jurisdictions to relieve suburban poverty was advocated recently in a think tank report.
‘Just a second,’ we say.
Based on direct observation of merging sprawl zones with older centres in Canada in the 1990s this is not necessarily a hot idea.
Clashing expectations and entitlements when it comes to program priorities and the taxes that support them are virtually guaranteed under amalgamation schemes.  I doubt greater Toronto’s Tory-led merger, enacted in 1998 and still viewed as illegitimate by many, can be said to have done much for poverty in say north Etobicoke or Scarborough.  Montreal had such awful experience of merging boroughs and core that they wound up eventually reversing it.
Would city mergers help alleviate suburban poverty
psmag.com
Suburban colonization – Wikipedia
image: Taylor Riche via Flickr/CC

(1212) Houston’s socioeconomic disaster


Nearly a week was required just to get a basic description together of the damage done by Hurricane Katrina to New Orleans, Louisiana in 2005.  Assessing Hurricane Harvey won’t be any easier.  If Katrina is the template we know that lower income and racialized groups will be bearing the brunt of this, big time.
An item from Thursday’s Washington Post is a good starting point regarding this multi-layered event and its consequences.
Poor Texans are going to suffer the most in Harvey, thanks to state politics
(video 1:22)
Media largely blind to Harvey’s devastating impact on poor Communities.” Hurricanes don’t care if you’re rich, poor, white, or black—but that doesn’t mean that every person is equally vulnerable to a storm.”
commondreams.org
Houston’s human catastrophe started long before the Storm. Decades of neglect, inequality, and disenfranchisement mean that all Houstonians, but especially the poorest and most vulnerable, have been left utterly undefended
thenation.org
Consider how inappropriate regional development makes Houston so vulnerable.
Hurricane Harvey wrecks up to a million cars in car dependent Houston
wired.com
More zoning wouldn’t have protected Houston from Harvey’s fury but less sprawl would have
nymag.com
Houston must plan an inclusive recovery after Harvey flooded its public housing
urban.org
Harvey tests the limits of how we feed people during disasters
citylab.com
See also: (1207) Hurricane Harvey
image: screenshot of newsreel from Texas Archives holdings