Tag Archives: economic conditions

(1272) The New Urban Crisis [Book review]

The New Urban Crisis.  How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class – and What We Can Do About It
Richard Florida
2017: Basic Books, NY
310 pages
Urban crisis is also suburban crisis.  What is bad for one is bad for the other, if in different ways.  For Florida’s take on all this we refer you to chapter eight of his most recent book.  This chapter functions as a data-supported handbook to the sprawl zones.  In an era of what he calls winner-take-all urbanism staged by and for the so-called creative class, well, the further out you go it seems the deeper the doo-doo.  Please read.
The new suburban crisis
citylab.com

(1261) Bomb Cyclone: an indoors poverty reading list


To keep you out of harm’s way should recent weather warnings turn out not to be exaggerations – some features about having the kinds of communities we’d like to have.
Media get it wrong on Bank of Canada minimum wage study
rozkowski.org
The places that may never recover from the recession.
The Rust Belt isn’t the only region left behind by the economic recovery. The suburbs of the American west are struggling, too
citylab.com
In defence of degrowth
counterpunch.org
The next financial crisis will be worse than the last one
truthdig.com
Any shame around poverty lies with the society that perpetuates it, not the poor
trhuth-out.org
Where you live should not harm your health
acto.ca
Poor neighbourhoods make the best investments
strongtowns.org
image: via Flickr/CC

 

(1251) Canada’s uneven tax regime

You help to pay about three-and-a-half times more taxes than Canada’s corporations.  This didn’t start up recently as some neo-liberal kick-in-the-head, either.  The two figures pulled apart from each other in the early 1950s.  This arrangement is carried thanks to stagnant wages, too.
Man, you guys are a generous people…
The high cost of low corporate taxes
thestar.com
image: Anthony Easton via Flickr/CC

(1244) Prosperity ranking


Canadians still count themselves lucky to have escaped much of the type of economic madness that came to afflict the United States after the 2008 crash.  Still, there seems to be some discomfort with the state of things here if the Legatum Institute’s Prosperity Index is to be believed.  This globally-focussed think tank praises Canada frequently, placing us at number eight this year with Yemen dead last and Norway number one, after assessing a range of socio economic factors.  This index is picked up quite widely in the business media most years and it appears to contain much general truth.
Prosperity ranking slips to 2007 level: index weighs Canadians’ outlook on financial and societal factors
thestar.com

(1146) This might be kinda cool!

Strong Towns is such a wonderful blog, always interesting.  Like this piece about the possibilities for artists and makers in places where:
”…the next Mecca of the creative class is most likely to emerge. This is the kind of rapidly declining suburban landscape that is in evidence all across North America. It isn’t leafy and tranquil like the better suburbs. The schools are crap. But it isn’t vibrant like the best urban locations either. This spot is too far from the city to easily access good jobs, but it’s just close enough to receive the undesirable overflows from the greater metroplex. Tax revenues are evaporating just as legacy public obligations really start to roll in. Property values are dropping like a stone. The authorities are already quietly withdrawing in an attempt to maintain the better parts of town. Perfect!”
The future of unlikely places
On the other hand, this is also Kensington:

For these Philly librarians, drug tourists and overdose drills are part of the job
philly.com

image: Marc-Anthony Macon via Flickr/CC

(1138) USA shopocalypse


Macy’s, Sears, Payless Shoes.  America’s favourite merchandise outlets melt into air.  Retail here in the greater Toronto Area has been overbuilt for a while now but nobody is calling it an apocalypse quite yet.  Unlike in the United States, where ‘retail apocalypse’ is a Wikipedia entry and daily reality.  While retail jobs were nothing special they were readily available, especially to women and youth.  Many an immigrant to North America held things together with mall employment, too.
Wikipedia: Retail Apocalypse
The retail apocalypse is suburban.  Cities will weather this concentrated downturn becasue they went through it 50 years ago. Their neighbours may not be so lucky
slate.com
What caused the retail apocalypse?
theweek.com
See also: (352) Mall living
image: Sarah Martin via Flickr/CC