Tag Archives: economic conditions

(1107) Up from underground


From time-to-time, we do give some thought to who gets what in this economy.  There are worse places when it comes to inequality and the general discourse on status than Toronto and area.  Still, some more thought could be directed to where the wealth comes from, Toronto’s role in a global economy.  This feature brings our eyes and minds to one of our most important economic inputs: mining.  An input that helps make Toronto what it is but which remains obscure, unconsidered.

Toronto’s buried history: the dark story of how mining built a city. Even most residents don’t know Toronto is the global headquarters of the mining industry – but scratch the surface and some uncomfortable truths are revealed
theguardian.com

(1076) Two versus 11 million: Canada WTF?


Well, it’s a wonder anyone can see Canada as a prosperous, progressive nation after findings like this come to light.  It’s a wonder anyone can say work pays and will protect us from poverty here.
This kinda money and you could take a cab to work every day and eat at Red Lobster any time you wanted.  What comes after this, Canada?
Either way, Happy Monday.
2 richest Canadians have wealth equal to 11 million poorest. David Thomson and Galen Weston Sr. as wealthy as poorest 30 per cent of the country combined, Oxfam calculates
cbc.ca/news

image: angela N. via Flickr/CC

(1096) CEO victory day [CCPA report]


Today is the day when Canada’s chief corporate executives blow past the rest of us in earnings for the year.  They must be a very talented, special gang making between 3 and 183 million dollars a year. Wow.
Top CEOs earn more by today than average Canadian does all year: report
ctvnews.ca (video 3:38)
Throwing money at the problem: ten years of executive compensation
policyalternatives.ca
Canada’s top 100 paid CEOs: Canada’s top paid CEOs now take home 193 times what an average Canadian worker does. That’s not the only wage gap visible in this ranking
canadianbusiness.com
image: Flickr/CC

(1068) Subdivided. City Building in an Age of Hyper-Diversity [Book review]

Subdivided. City Building In An Age of Hyper-Diversity
Jay Pitter & John Lorinc, editors
2016. Coach House Books, Toronto
279 pages. $20.95 CAN
This collection of essays was much tougher reading than we expected.  After nearly six years blogging about social difficulty in the suburbs we don’t expect to be unnerved by our topic.  Subdivided unnerved us.
The good old days of multiculturalism, in which eastern and southern Europeans (and maybe a few other groups), found Toronto adjusting to, and eventually welcoming, them are long gone.  In its place, we now see an ever bigger and richer Toronto home to newcomers in a living arrangement of hyper-diversity.  This infinitely more complex Toronto is by turns depressing, ugly, unjust and unequal despite recurrent commentary about its peacefulness, high socio-cultural potential and general awesomeness.
Subdivided delivers unto us many a less-than-comfortable truth.  There’s too many people here in isolated lives centred on a combination of shit jobs and lacklustre housing.  Reading Subdivided made us feel like Toronto’s diversity is the stuff of an Adam Curtis documentary, another nightmarish expression of the global economic machine and its operating system, neoliberalism.
That toughness of presentation is what makes this collection of essays so amazing, so real.  It’s hard to think of any other such wellspring of direct, sustained observation of what it is really like to live here.  A chapter on Brampton, for example, brings forth a wave of nausea faster than a jar of expired mayonnaise.  ‘Browntown’ is next door to suburban-poverty.com’s backyard, we can attest to the truth of what is said here about Brampton.  Same for another entry on Mississauga, which is literally our backyard.  You’d almost wonder why Canada bothers attracting new residents to its Sprawlvilles.  Except perhaps as a cycnical ploy to increase domestic markets and the tax base and to fulfill some corporate/ideological role in the global economy.
What to do?  Good transit, a strong social safety net, higher wages, police reform, and affordable housing would help us toward a healthy, cross-connected society according to the essays in Subdivided.  None of these things will be achieved quickly or cheaply, though.
We better get busy before something really awful comes of the present lame and indifferent regime of city building in greater Toronto.  Stress is not good for the indivdual or the community.  Stress and reaction brought us Rob Ford, the scale model mock up of Donald Trump.  Who knows what the stresses of race and class we are leaving in place will inflict on us?  We aren’t Milwaukee yet but how much longer will we sleepwalk into this?

We suggest future editions of Subdivided include a stamped, pre-addressed thank you card readers can mail to the one percent.

Buy Subdivided for your unnerved urban affairs shelf.

(1064) Productive Canadians need a raise [CSLS report]

csls-report-cover
Merit is supposed to be one of the anchor concepts of modern economics.  A good product, for example, merits sales, a smart lawyer merits his fees, and so on.  Why aren’t we productive Canadians getting a nicer hit on payday, then?  Our productivity is up but the Centre for the Study of Living Standards finds that we aren’t really being rewarded for that.  Wages have risen more slowly over time than our productivity.  Have we changed our tune on merit?
Labour productivity and the distribution of real earnings in Canada, 1976-2014 (45-page .pdf file)
csls.ca

(1050) Precariousness as policy

quiet signage
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives produces Policy Notes as a reinforcement and alternative to its longer reports.  This recent one from the BC office looks in at a topic well in the precinct of anyone concerned with suburban poverty.
If precarious employment is the new normal, how come we’re not talking about it?
…well, at least a federal minister is talking at us about precariousness, nay he appears to be advocating it.
Finance Minister says Canadians should get used to short-term employment. Calling it ‘job churn,’ Minister Bill Morneau told Niagara Falls crowd to expect a number of career changes in a person’s life
metronews.ca
image: Lefteris Heretakis via Flickr/CC