Tag Archives: employment

(1071) Part time existence [TD Canada Trust report]


Major bank reports about the state of the economy are part of Canada’s information landscape and pretty much always have been.   They are designed to tell us, in rationalized detail, where things are at.  The reports set us up for what to expect from the major players in the country’s economic existence.  This last one is a bit of a doozy, though.  Most new jobs created in Canada since the 2009 recession have been part time.  Last year, every single one was.  Is this good?

Canada created lots of jobs last year. Almost all were part time: TD
globalnews.ca

(1073) Fu&k work

end-of-work
Is work a forever thing?  Probably, in the sense it just means doing stuff to secure our existence, yes, you can bet on work.  Employment in a complex consumer-industrial society on the basis rationalized value systems (like, oh, say the Protestant work ethic) that rewards individual merit and builds up community, well, that is turning out to be a whole other thing.
With deindustrialization, financialization, free trade agreements, and automation work may soon cease to exist at anything like the scale we in North America have come to know it.  In this piece from Aeon a US academic asks us to get ahead of events and economics and free ourselves from our cultural perceptions.  Tone and logic make this a really great piece.  Statistics are used to bolster the author’s arguments and the title is nicely provocative to boot!
Fuck work. Economists believe in full employment. Americans think that work builds character. But what if jobs aren’t working anymore?

(1050) Precariousness as policy

quiet signage
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives produces Policy Notes as a reinforcement and alternative to its longer reports.  This recent one from the BC office looks in at a topic well in the precinct of anyone concerned with suburban poverty.
If precarious employment is the new normal, how come we’re not talking about it?
…well, at least a federal minister is talking at us about precariousness, nay he appears to be advocating it.
Finance Minister says Canadians should get used to short-term employment. Calling it ‘job churn,’ Minister Bill Morneau told Niagara Falls crowd to expect a number of career changes in a person’s life
metronews.ca
image: Lefteris Heretakis via Flickr/CC

(992) Building the poverty right in, or not

subway rendering 22
Earlier this year urban planning was said to be the hot new occupation.  Nice!  Especially if it means we’ll have more people paying attention to the built, spatial dimension of inequality and poverty?  Hope so.  No kids, it isn’t all groovy, inclusive charettes and pencil crayon renderings of LRTs.  Here’s a couple of recent pieces to help the young upstarts dig into the realities.

Mapping the city. How transit can fix access to jobs in Toronto
utoronto.ca

How urban design perpetuates racial inequality – and what we can do about it. Our cities weren’t created equal. But they don’t have to stay that way
fastcodesign.com

image: Chicago Transit Authority archives via Flickr/CC