Tag Archives: income

(1292) Ontario basic income pilot cancellation


If Ontario’s new Drug Ford government thought they could just cancel a large scale test of a basic income program and everybody would just forget about it they may be disappointed.  What an embarrassment.  Where’s all this business intelligence Ford is supposed to have?  Poverty is bloody expensive and Ford gave indications during the election campaign that the pilot would be respected.  This cancellation represents a total poverty of imagination and total failure to embrace reality and deal with complexity.
A buck a beer?  Go fuck yourselves.  One of their own party elders wrote the paper the test is based on.  Senator Segal is quite eloquent here on CBC regarding the cancellation.
Scrapping basic income pilot ‘horrific,’ former Tory senator says
cbc.ca/news
image: HiMY SYeD via Flickr/CC

(1264) Sears & loathing in Davos


The work of folding slacks, swiping credit cards and stocking shelves was enough to keep Sears going in Canada as a profitable, dividend-paying and executive bonus-giving retailer for decades.  Then management decided to pack it all in.  Emperor Justinian, representing us at Davos, seems to think it’s all pretty much okay, including the company leaving behind a whopper of a deficit in its pension plan.
Will 16,000 Sears Canada retirees see their pensions?
thespec.com
Trudeau suggests EI for Sears workers who risk losing pensions
huffingtonpost.ca
Image: Mike Kalasnik via Flickr/CC

(1258) CEOS 2018 blowout


Before lunch yesterday the top 100 or so members of the executive class would have blown past the yearly average pay for a Canadian worker.  Through the cost to the public of goods and services we pay for this.
Just like last year…
It’s official: Canada’s richest CEOs pocketed the average worker’s annual income before lunch today. Are Canada’s high-rolling corporate bosses really 209 times more valuable than the rest of us?
pressprogress.ca
image: Vlad Podvorny via Flickr/CC

(1234) On the lighter side…


”Action is what matters.” -Gene Simmons, 2017

Two comic efforts at understanding North American economic reality brought some laffs to the suburban-poverty.com bunker complex this week.  Unintentionally hilarious, but no less instructive for that, is a hot new self help book from KISS front man Gene Simmons. The second, a sharp strike from Rick Mercer.
To understand Gene’s book, picture an elevator shaft as black as On Power’s faux leather cover at the bottom.  Ayn Rand chugs a mickey of rye whiskey on an empty stomache, takes two or three hits off a crack pipe and tosses herself down the elevator shaft.
Mercer’s rant about Ontario’s coming move to a higher minimum wage is a little more to our liking.  Together, the two efforts tackle powerful myths about life here.
editor’s note: let’s give Gene props for urging us to read books and self educate.  He’s right, there are no excuses when all the knowledge of the world is available to us on the screens in our hands.

(1231) Stockton, CA

Stockton, California did a post-2008 crash-and-burn rivalled perhaps only by Detroit in terms of American municipal financial disaster.  By embracing an economy built on minimally regulated suburban real-estate development and low taxes the city of about three hundred thousand in the San Joaquin Valley ran maximum risk with its economic health.  The result?  Maximum bust.
Stockton, CA: one of America’s most miserable cities just got more miserable
forbes.com
All the woes of America from foreclosures to rising crime and obesity and declining schools seem to beset Stockton and grip the city in a depressing vice.  A new mayor, however, has begun to reconceive Stockton with a modest basic income program as part of his plan for trying to move things forward.
Three years ago, Stockton, California, was bankrupt. Now it’s trying out a basic income. A city on the outskirts of Silicon Valley is using Facebook money to fund a basic income trial
vox.com (numerous links)

(1230) Tax havens & CASW statement on uBIG

This week we were reminded that the federal Liberal party’s bag men are no strangers to the benefits of stashing one’s money overseas.  Hey, even Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has a couple hundred pounds in that fancy hat.  Attention for the matter of how Canada’s elites array their money has, unfortunately, proved fleeting.
Also predictably disappointing was a near total lack of media interest in a statement from a professional body of Canadian social workers in favour of recent official interest in basic income.  Like other observers, the social workers have come to find Canada’s approach to the costly presence of poverty here less than effective.  Along with the experience of doctors and nurses, the knowledge of social workers has to be considered with high seriousness in this area.  Money stashed overseas in tax havens would seem to at least hint at the ability of this society to afford social policies that would eradicate poverty.
From safety net to stable foundation: CASW recommends a universal basic income
casw-acts.ca (with links to 2014 & 2015 papers on inequality that consider UBI)
Paradise Papers underscore need for tax justice
rabble.ca
Queen Elizabeth II has $13M in investments in offshore tax havens: documents
global.ca
How will governments solve the tax haven riddle? Offshore tax havens cost us all billions, but cracking down on them is like a game of whack-a-mole, writes the Star’s Marco Chown Oved in an analysis following the Paradise Papers leak
thestar.com

(1228) GTA income & equality update

For low income neighbourhoods to increase from 9% of a place to  51% of a place is a pretty crap reality.  Welcome to Brampton and Mississauga, once showpieces of growth and consumer choice.  Really, if you know anything about social conditions here the update to a 2015 United Way report will not surprise you.
Toronto region becoming more divided along income lines
thestar.com
And oh boy, the reports are never in short supply for long.  From late September: word about older citizens and others in food difficulty.
Who’s Hungry in Our City? 2017
North York Harvest & Daily Bread Food Bank
Not working isn’t the cause of all this.  In case you were wondering about 60% of those in poverty in Canada are in work.
Canadians for Public Justice 2017 Poverty Trends
cpj.ca