Tag Archives: poverty

(1252) Alabama


Alabama’s worst has been on display all month.  First up, a member of the elites with no shame running for election to help bolster a benefit plan for wealthy donors to the Republican party.  The second was a more low-key story in terms of media coverage but one of no small interest at suburban-poverty.com.
Oh Alabama.  A United Nations ‘deprivation expert’ has recorded his impressions of open human sewage next to the homes of your poor.
UN poverty official touring Alabama’s Black Belt: ‘I haven’t seen this’ in the First World
al.com
A journey through a land of extreme poverty: welcome to America
theguardian.com
Hookworm, a disease of extreme poverty, is thriving in the US south. Why?
theguardian.com
The recovery still hasn’t made most Americans whole again
seattletimes.com

(1230) Tax havens & CASW statement on uBIG

This week we were reminded that the federal Liberal party’s bag men are no strangers to the benefits of stashing one’s money overseas.  Hey, even Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has a couple hundred pounds in that fancy hat.  Attention for the matter of how Canada’s elites array their money has, unfortunately, proved fleeting.
Also predictably disappointing was a near total lack of media interest in a statement from a professional body of Canadian social workers in favour of recent official interest in basic income.  Like other observers, the social workers have come to find Canada’s approach to the costly presence of poverty here less than effective.  Along with the experience of doctors and nurses, the knowledge of social workers has to be considered with high seriousness in this area.  Money stashed overseas in tax havens would seem to at least hint at the ability of this society to afford social policies that would eradicate poverty.
From safety net to stable foundation: CASW recommends a universal basic income
casw-acts.ca (with links to 2014 & 2015 papers on inequality that consider UBI)
Paradise Papers underscore need for tax justice
rabble.ca
Queen Elizabeth II has $13M in investments in offshore tax havens: documents
global.ca
How will governments solve the tax haven riddle? Offshore tax havens cost us all billions, but cracking down on them is like a game of whack-a-mole, writes the Star’s Marco Chown Oved in an analysis following the Paradise Papers leak
thestar.com

(1228) GTA income & equality update

For low income neighbourhoods to increase from 9% of a place to  51% of a place is a pretty crap reality.  Welcome to Brampton and Mississauga, once showpieces of growth and consumer choice.  Really, if you know anything about social conditions here the update to a 2015 United Way report will not surprise you.
Toronto region becoming more divided along income lines
thestar.com
And oh boy, the reports are never in short supply for long.  From late September: word about older citizens and others in food difficulty.
Who’s Hungry in Our City? 2017
North York Harvest & Daily Bread Food Bank
Not working isn’t the cause of all this.  In case you were wondering about 60% of those in poverty in Canada are in work.
Canadians for Public Justice 2017 Poverty Trends
cpj.ca

(1227) Detroit


Hard times in the 313 have been news for some time.  These recent features look in at the situation beyond a reviving downtown and asks if philanthropists could be doing more in suburban Detroit.
Suburban poverty on the rise, but is philanthropy following?
crainsdetroit.com
To track suburban poverty trends, look to the schools
crainsdetroit.com
Mary Kramer on WJR: poverty rising in suburbs
crainsdetroit.com (audio 5:43)
image: Mike Boening via Flickr/CC

(1215) Places In Need [Book review]

Places In Need: the Changing Geography of Poverty
Scott W. Allard
New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2017
300 pages
Clutching our health cards and anti-nausea medication we Canadians look south at a noisily declining Trumpistan.  Where, we wonder, just as the hurricanes seem set to pressure wash a lot of bad suburban development off of the sunbelt like so much graffiti from a school wall, is the empire going?  What is the underlying state of daily existence there?
Places In Need is easily one of the tools to pick up when you are ready to construct an understanding of American socio-economic and spatial reality.  What a job that will be, too.  Poverty has been having its way with American communities of every type for decades.
This is nowhere more the case than in the suburbs, older inner ones and the younger sprawl zones alike.  It has taken time to understand the transition the suburbs have gone through from exemplars of progress and prosperity into something much different.  There’s little excuse now for the persistence of magic thinking about suburban economics.
Scott W. Allard is well established in his role documenting the relationship between being poor and where you are in America.  In this latest book he marshals statistical analysis and direct observation.  The result is a work of gravity with a not inconsiderable moral centre that inevitably asks, ”what is to be done?”
It will become even harder to look away from America in the coming decades as it grapples with inequality and social division.  The first chapters in Places In Need describe suburban poverty and really leave no doubt we are not in a fake news zone here.
Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Chicago are the focal metro areas of the book.  Dozens of US communities are mentioned.  Suburban poverty tracks to many places and some of the phenomena from these places are evident in Canada.  Early passages on Chicago in particular can be applied to the Greater Toronto Area and Vancouver with little modification.
Chapter six of Places In Need runs the suburban paradigm against social programs designed to combat poverty.  The author mounts a defence of these programs and asks that they be adapted, improved.
Poverty has doubled in American suburbs since 1990 (page 99).  It is quite racialized as well with striking depth and concentration.  All that extra space out there means support is hard to get to.  Automotive expenses push hard against personal budgets supported by low wage employment.  Public officials in suburban areas are seen failing to acknowledge the extent or event he existence at all of poverty in their jurisdictions.  Maps and census data as well as the author’s interview work back up the description. that still seems unexpected to many, i.e. that great social difficulty in America is not confined to rural areas or inner cities.
At this blog we are getting impatient with descriptions.  We’d like to see more about solutions though Allard does justice to what we are going to need to rethink the changed geography of poverty and how to respond.  Pentagon spending and fossil fuel subsidies weren’t mentioned.  Nor did we see anything much about a universal basic income, regulatory approaches to real estate development, infrastructure spending (especially on public transit), immigration reform, minimum wage legislation or support for education.
These things comprise social democracy and that is, in our opinion, the way you resist poverty and elevate the nature of a place best.  Americans need to understand this to get out of their suburban poverty and Canadians to keep from going any deeper into it.

(1185) Hygiene poverty


As with food and fuel we can attach hygiene to the word poverty more easily than we like.  Making poverty a plural may be pushing it a little at the moment but if we continue with our present economic systems we might just have to.  This UK item squares with our observations of a busy drop in centre in the Greater Toronto Area where personal care supplies were always very popular.
Poverty driving people to choose between eating or keeping clean. In Kind Direct charity warns of ‘hidden crisis’ facing thousands after it distributes £20.2m of hygiene products in one year
theguardian.com
See also:
(1094) Period poverty
(597) Free tampons!

(1178) This week in Ontario poverty


Here’s a hint or two at what poverty was like this week in Canada’s richest, most populous province.
Job vacancies in Windsor-Sarnia some of the lowest paying in Ontario
windsorstar.com
Hamilton’s poverty activists clash with business groups, Tory MPPs over labour reforms
hamiltonnews.com
Women, recent immigrants to see big benefits from minimum wage increase.  Of the 633,000 people who would receive raises in Toronto, 58 per cent are women and 17 per cent are recent immigrants
thestar.com
Demanding a fair share. Protecting worker’s rights in the on-demand service economy
ccpa.ca (links to 26-page .pdf file)
image: Peter Vanderheyden via Flickr/CC

(1156) Suburban blues…


Though the reasons for the suburban crisis aren’t necessarily different from the problems facing cities—a lack of good jobs and weakening social programs—an historical cultural and political neglect of the suburban poor means that new frontiers of inequality are exploding invisibly where we least expect them. Urban poverty, measured by Census tract, has grown from about 18 to 20 percent between 1990 and 2014, but risen more drastically in the suburbs, from about 8 percent to over 12 percent of tracts. And in the last decade, a “tipping point” has been reached in which “the number of poor people living in suburban areas has increased more quickly.”
-Michelle Chen

The Nation asks…

Why are America’s suburbs becoming poorer?  Contrary to popular perception, it’s not just because the poor are moving out of the cities

thenation.com
image: Bonnie Natko via Flickr/CC