Tag Archives: public transit

(1305) Transit freedom in Luxembourg


Tiny ( and rich ) Luxembourg made mass transit free at the point of use for the entire country last month.  Vehicular congestion and air pollution is cited as the primary motivations for this undertaking but we like to see it as a healthy example of social democracy in action.  This is a systemic gift to ordinary people in the heart of a continent that has seen a strong general trend in the opposite direction, toward inequality and the running down of public services.  Next? Greater Toronto?
Free public transit! (sorry, it’s in Luxembourg)
streetsblog.org
image: Gerard-Nicolas Mannes via Flickr.com

(1265) Los Angeles

The general look and feel of Los Angeles, California is readily understood by anyone who has spent any time near North America’s sprawl lands.  The sheer size of Los Angeles, and the inequality and environmental racism it contains — however familiar it’s basic form — is enough to give pause to anyone, though.
Certainly there’s visual evidence nearly everywhere of what is said to be a homeless population now numbering fifty thousand.  Beat up recreational vehicles are homes to many Angelenos.  You come across them constantly.   People camp everywhere from the lawns at city hall to highway medians.
By the late 1970s it seems that a sense of dread had become so attached to this brutally car-dependent collection of over eighty municipal entities that a truly massive investment in rail-based public transit was kicked off.  While plagued with construction challenges, including major cost overruns, this program has been bearing fruit for a while now.  There are also voices fighting for cycling and walking and the bus network.  The latter is especially important to the working people of Los Angeles.
Please take a look at this Los Angelist video about the Metro Red Line.  Much of the rationale found in it is applicable to Canadian cities, to sprawl lands found anywhere.  The sheer enormity of Los Angeles helps bring these issues into focus perhaps in a way much more raw than they might be encountered where you live but there is much to be learned.

(1229) Transport poverty

Three items reminding us that how we move around our community reflects and helps determine our status there.
Low-wage jobs are moving to distant suburbs. How will workers get there?  As low-wage jobs shift out of the cities, some employers use the rides as a way to attract workers from urban areas.
star-tribune.com
Why the fight for better transit is part of the fight for racial equity. There are two things I want desperately: justice and better public transit
citylab.com
Transportation: the overlooked poverty problem
sharedjustice.org
See also: (47) No ride? No job!
image: Leo U via Flickr/CC

(1038) Busways can help

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While busways may not be as cool as LRT and HSR lines, regional rail networks or subways they certainly seem to have a place in addressing suburban poverty.  How so?  By helping carless/low income workers get around better.  At any rate, here is a specific US example of the busway benefit.

How Montgomery County’s bus rapid transit can alleviate suburban poverty
streetsblog.net

image: BeyondDC via Flickr/CC

(1024) Dallas

99705683_3bb5aa39ab_z”That’s how life goes along the poverty line in car-centric cities like Dallas, whose 20th-century growth birthed highways that became developmental skeletons for suburbs where the middle class have fled for decades. Left behind is an urban core with housing and socioeconomic problems — and infrastructure built for cars that many poor people can’t afford.”

Reminicisent of other encounters with what it’s like to get to work in the sprawl, a feature from the Dallas News follows a worker to work.  And it ain’t easy.

Stemming poverty in Dallas requires rethinking mobility

image: Broken Piggy Bank via Flickr/CC