Tag Archives: solutions

(1220) Ontario basic income challenges


Ontario’s basic income pilot program moves forward and real world details accumulate about it.  This is the hard work part, turning a theoretical schema into a reality.
Again, with variations of this hideous term ‘free money’ which The Star ought to know better than to use because it is so biased towards the right leaning critique of basic income.
Handing out money for free harder than it looks. Ontario began issuing basic income cheques in July, but reaching eligible participants has been a challenge
thestar.com

(1213) CNU report highlights transportation woes for suburban poor

Congress for the New Urbanism has produced a report on the spatial hardship of living in sprawl.  Lower income people often find themselves pushed outward to places where transportation drains their resources when it comes to community participation, shopping, access to employment or public services.  CNU should be commended for adding greater depth to their general critique of placemaking with this document.  Seattle/Tacoma is the focus of the report but it’s general assumptions are applicable beyond there.
Why we should take suburban poverty seriously
cnu.org
image: Joe A Kunzler via Flickr/CC

(1195) Basic Income: and How We Can Make It Happen [Book review]

Basic Income: and How We Can Make It Happen
Guy Standing, 2017
Penguin Random House UK
374 pages
$18.99 CAN paperback
Chapter four of this treatise on the social policy mechanism of universal basic income is the sweetest.  There lies the magic of it all.  We know poverty is expensive.  A properly executed basic income would cut the cost of poverty and in so doing liberate a good portion of the fiscal resources needed to pay for itself.  By no means is this the only way to afford a social dividend for all citizens as chapter seven attests.  And afford it we must: this world is changing.
Guy Standing has been an intellectual point man for basic income on a global stage for many years now.  He gives us the rationale and the ‘how to’ in his newest book.  In the age of President 45, Boris Johnson, Rob Ford, Martin Skreli and other ineffective, uncaring and unhinged elite leaders Professor Standing has the contrasting voice of a grown adult.  He has taken on the work of comprehending and advocating something in detail.  At times things are technical, plodding even.  But to do any difficult thing, as an individual academic or as a society, makes the demand for seriousness.  It can also involve reward and rates respect.  So it is with this book.
Other parts of this manual refer to the expected benefits of basic income and clarify it from other approaches to social welfare including historical ones.  Somewhat new to our consideration of basic income was a potential contribution to environmental protection.  More familiar are sections of the book describing the improvement in the quality of economic relationships and personal well being associated with a fully realized and well-executed basic income.
An important chapter is number six.  Entitled The Standard Objections, it is designed to empower supporters of basic income.  Enthusiasm on the part of those already converted is not going to be the determinant of whether or not we get the goodies.  Not in an era of still lethal neoliberalism.  Other voters, taxpayers, citizens, policy makers will have to be won over.  A piece of work.
Chapter twelve displays its merits in this direction.  Professor Standing tells us  that ‘…the primary block to implementation of a basic income system is political, not economic or philosophical.’  Absolutely, this is true.  We also must understand that as never before there is an opportunity, a window, for basic income.  This last chapter is the one we will be reading over again as soon as possible.  This is where we go from lively possibility to reality via public pressure.  Here, anti-basic income emotionalism about worker dropout and a costly, unrealistic or even fully immoral ”something for nothing” pipe dream is addressed.
We do recommend this book.  How could we not, really?
guystanding.com

(1177) FCM document for poverty strategy


Consultations within Canada’s federal poverty reduction strategy can count an impressive and sensible report from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities among the front rank of contributions they have seen.  For us it worked pretty well as summer reading material, too!

Ending poverty starts locally. Municipal recommendations for a Canadian poverty reduction strategy
fcm.ca (17 page .pdf file)