Tag Archives: solutions

(1286) Repurposing an entire landscape


Golf courses, we’re looking at you.  Free mall?  Can we have two?   This is where the housing will go, where the missing middle will be found.
Positively 23rd Street (podcast)
npr.org
Dead golf courses are the new NIMBY battlefield. As the sport’s popularity wanes, vast amounts of under utilized land will be opened up. Can it be developed?
citylab.com
Landlords are practically giving malls away
bloomberg.com

(1274) Words from Ontario basic income trial


Ontario’s basic income pilot has begun to produce some observations and anecdotes.  A thorough, high level analysis will need to be done at the conclusion of the three-year, three-community trial but expectations are high.  The pilot project is not quite a full-on basic income, more of a test apparatus designed to gather evidence of what actually happens in the lives of a recipient.
Yes, there is still a fair bit of naysaying and skepticism out there.  Some of it from surprising directions like a major anti-poverty activist here in Ontario and from union figures.  Another hurdle may be the upcoming provincial election.  All kinds of right wing critters and neoliberal reactionaries are looking for power, for gravy trains to stop, as it were.  The pilot project may be an early target in the election and for whoever gets into the premier’s office.  In the meantime, words from the participants are appropriate.
From ‘barely surviving’ to thriving: Ontario basic income recipients report less stress, better health. The three-year pilot project, which began last summer, is testing whether no-strings-attached cash support can boost health, education and housing for people living in poverty
thestar.com
image: Hefin Owen via Flickr/CC

(1230) Tax havens & CASW statement on uBIG

This week we were reminded that the federal Liberal party’s bag men are no strangers to the benefits of stashing one’s money overseas.  Hey, even Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has a couple hundred pounds in that fancy hat.  Attention for the matter of how Canada’s elites array their money has, unfortunately, proved fleeting.
Also predictably disappointing was a near total lack of media interest in a statement from a professional body of Canadian social workers in favour of recent official interest in basic income.  Like other observers, the social workers have come to find Canada’s approach to the costly presence of poverty here less than effective.  Along with the experience of doctors and nurses, the knowledge of social workers has to be considered with high seriousness in this area.  Money stashed overseas in tax havens would seem to at least hint at the ability of this society to afford social policies that would eradicate poverty.
From safety net to stable foundation: CASW recommends a universal basic income
casw-acts.ca (with links to 2014 & 2015 papers on inequality that consider UBI)
Paradise Papers underscore need for tax justice
rabble.ca
Queen Elizabeth II has $13M in investments in offshore tax havens: documents
global.ca
How will governments solve the tax haven riddle? Offshore tax havens cost us all billions, but cracking down on them is like a game of whack-a-mole, writes the Star’s Marco Chown Oved in an analysis following the Paradise Papers leak
thestar.com

(1220) Ontario basic income challenges


Ontario’s basic income pilot program moves forward and real world details accumulate about it.  This is the hard work part, turning a theoretical schema into a reality.
Again, with variations of this hideous term ‘free money’ which The Star ought to know better than to use because it is so biased towards the right leaning critique of basic income.
Handing out money for free harder than it looks. Ontario began issuing basic income cheques in July, but reaching eligible participants has been a challenge
thestar.com

(1213) CNU report highlights transportation woes for suburban poor

Congress for the New Urbanism has produced a report on the spatial hardship of living in sprawl.  Lower income people often find themselves pushed outward to places where transportation drains their resources when it comes to community participation, shopping, access to employment or public services.  CNU should be commended for adding greater depth to their general critique of placemaking with this document.  Seattle/Tacoma is the focus of the report but it’s general assumptions are applicable beyond there.
Why we should take suburban poverty seriously
cnu.org
image: Joe A Kunzler via Flickr/CC