Tag Archives: statistics

(1258) CEOS 2018 blowout


Before lunch yesterday the top 100 or so members of the executive class would have blown past the yearly average pay for a Canadian worker.  Through the cost to the public of goods and services we pay for this.
Just like last year…
It’s official: Canada’s richest CEOs pocketed the average worker’s annual income before lunch today. Are Canada’s high-rolling corporate bosses really 209 times more valuable than the rest of us?
pressprogress.ca
image: Vlad Podvorny via Flickr/CC

(1252) Alabama


Alabama’s worst has been on display all month.  First up, a member of the elites with no shame running for election to help bolster a benefit plan for wealthy donors to the Republican party.  The second was a more low-key story in terms of media coverage but one of no small interest at suburban-poverty.com.
Oh Alabama.  A United Nations ‘deprivation expert’ has recorded his impressions of open human sewage next to the homes of your poor.
UN poverty official touring Alabama’s Black Belt: ‘I haven’t seen this’ in the First World
al.com
A journey through a land of extreme poverty: welcome to America
theguardian.com
Hookworm, a disease of extreme poverty, is thriving in the US south. Why?
theguardian.com
The recovery still hasn’t made most Americans whole again
seattletimes.com

(1251) Canada’s uneven tax regime

You help to pay about three-and-a-half times more taxes than Canada’s corporations.  This didn’t start up recently as some neo-liberal kick-in-the-head, either.  The two figures pulled apart from each other in the early 1950s.  This arrangement is carried thanks to stagnant wages, too.
Man, you guys are a generous people…
The high cost of low corporate taxes
thestar.com
image: Anthony Easton via Flickr/CC

(1244) Prosperity ranking


Canadians still count themselves lucky to have escaped much of the type of economic madness that came to afflict the United States after the 2008 crash.  Still, there seems to be some discomfort with the state of things here if the Legatum Institute’s Prosperity Index is to be believed.  This globally-focussed think tank praises Canada frequently, placing us at number eight this year with Yemen dead last and Norway number one, after assessing a range of socio economic factors.  This index is picked up quite widely in the business media most years and it appears to contain much general truth.
Prosperity ranking slips to 2007 level: index weighs Canadians’ outlook on financial and societal factors
thestar.com

(1238) Adult workforce participation


News that half of Canadians in their prime working years don’t have a full time permanent job is a bit of a puzzle.  Consider this against the central place in this culture occupied by the folklore of occupations and work, status and wages, the entire socioeconomic package of Canadian life.

Census 2016: Canadians in prime working years less likely to hold full-time jobs
theglobeandmail.com

image: aldisley via Flickr/CC