Tag Archives: statistics

(1228) GTA income & equality update

For low income neighbourhoods to increase from 9% of a place to  51% of a place is a pretty crap reality.  Welcome to Brampton and Mississauga, once showpieces of growth and consumer choice.  Really, if you know anything about social conditions here the update to a 2015 United Way report will not surprise you.
Toronto region becoming more divided along income lines
thestar.com
And oh boy, the reports are never in short supply for long.  From late September: word about older citizens and others in food difficulty.
Who’s Hungry in Our City? 2017
North York Harvest & Daily Bread Food Bank
Not working isn’t the cause of all this.  In case you were wondering about 60% of those in poverty in Canada are in work.
Canadians for Public Justice 2017 Poverty Trends
cpj.ca

(1215) Places In Need [Book review]

Places In Need: the Changing Geography of Poverty
Scott W. Allard
New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2017
300 pages
Clutching our health cards and anti-nausea medication we Canadians look south at a noisily declining Trumpistan.  Where, we wonder, just as the hurricanes seem set to pressure wash a lot of bad suburban development off of the sunbelt like so much graffiti from a school wall, is the empire going?  What is the underlying state of daily existence there?
Places In Need is easily one of the tools to pick up when you are ready to construct an understanding of American socio-economic and spatial reality.  What a job that will be, too.  Poverty has been having its way with American communities of every type for decades.
This is nowhere more the case than in the suburbs, older inner ones and the younger sprawl zones alike.  It has taken time to understand the transition the suburbs have gone through from exemplars of progress and prosperity into something much different.  There’s little excuse now for the persistence of magic thinking about suburban economics.
Scott W. Allard is well established in his role documenting the relationship between being poor and where you are in America.  In this latest book he marshals statistical analysis and direct observation.  The result is a work of gravity with a not inconsiderable moral centre that inevitably asks, ”what is to be done?”
It will become even harder to look away from America in the coming decades as it grapples with inequality and social division.  The first chapters in Places In Need describe suburban poverty and really leave no doubt we are not in a fake news zone here.
Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Chicago are the focal metro areas of the book.  Dozens of US communities are mentioned.  Suburban poverty tracks to many places and some of the phenomena from these places are evident in Canada.  Early passages on Chicago in particular can be applied to the Greater Toronto Area and Vancouver with little modification.
Chapter six of Places In Need runs the suburban paradigm against social programs designed to combat poverty.  The author mounts a defence of these programs and asks that they be adapted, improved.
Poverty has doubled in American suburbs since 1990 (page 99).  It is quite racialized as well with striking depth and concentration.  All that extra space out there means support is hard to get to.  Automotive expenses push hard against personal budgets supported by low wage employment.  Public officials in suburban areas are seen failing to acknowledge the extent or event he existence at all of poverty in their jurisdictions.  Maps and census data as well as the author’s interview work back up the description. that still seems unexpected to many, i.e. that great social difficulty in America is not confined to rural areas or inner cities.
At this blog we are getting impatient with descriptions.  We’d like to see more about solutions though Allard does justice to what we are going to need to rethink the changed geography of poverty and how to respond.  Pentagon spending and fossil fuel subsidies weren’t mentioned.  Nor did we see anything much about a universal basic income, regulatory approaches to real estate development, infrastructure spending (especially on public transit), immigration reform, minimum wage legislation or support for education.
These things comprise social democracy and that is, in our opinion, the way you resist poverty and elevate the nature of a place best.  Americans need to understand this to get out of their suburban poverty and Canadians to keep from going any deeper into it.

(1205) Stress is all that’s holding us together


A squeeze is on working people in the United Kingdom, the States and Canada.  The calculus of personal pressure and hard times described in this piece from The Guardian website is certainly reproduced in the Greater Toronto Area.  Such difficulty seems to be a big part of what it means to be a working person in these societies.  Mentioned in this piece is the weak economics of wages for a couple with a young child in Glasgow where a call-centre job really just doesn’t cut it.  The weight of this at the societal level is also discovered via this article.  Recent data from a UK university is linked concluding a crap job is often much worse for your mental health than the stresses of full on unemployment.
Crazy stuff indeed.  The late nineteenth century industrial economy was fuelled on coal.  Our early twenty-first century digital economy is fuelled on human stress.
The stress of low-paid work is making our country sick
Having a bad job can be worse for your health than being unemployed
manchester.ac.uk
image: Flood G. via Flickr/CC

(1196) Unequal Ontario [CCPA report]


Ontario needs to find a better balance when it comes to wages and economic relationships.  A new report finds richer Ontarians doing well while their low income neighbours keep sliding.
Labour market doing ‘no favours’ for low income families
thestar.com
Poor Ontario families getting poorer. New research says bottom half of families in Ontario are earning less, while richer families earn more
cbc.ca/news
Ontario’s middle and working class families are losing ground
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – links to 32-page .pdf file
Minimum wage hike needed as half of Ontarians see wages shrink
huffingtonpost.ca
Ontario minimum wage increase good for workers and business: economist
bnn.ca (video 8:14)

(1188) Risk to US mothers

Sometimes a single statistic stops us in our tracks.
A woman in Texas is ten times as likely to die due to pregnancy than a woman in Sweden or Spain.  This morbidity is right at the top of the ”developed” world’s list.  Among other things, it defies the experience of countries where maternal mortality can be zero in certain years.
If Americans love moms, why do we let them die?
nytimes.com