Tag Archives: suburbs

(1146) This might be kinda cool!

Strong Towns is such a wonderful blog, always interesting.  Like this piece about the possibilities for artists and makers in places where:
”…the next Mecca of the creative class is most likely to emerge. This is the kind of rapidly declining suburban landscape that is in evidence all across North America. It isn’t leafy and tranquil like the better suburbs. The schools are crap. But it isn’t vibrant like the best urban locations either. This spot is too far from the city to easily access good jobs, but it’s just close enough to receive the undesirable overflows from the greater metroplex. Tax revenues are evaporating just as legacy public obligations really start to roll in. Property values are dropping like a stone. The authorities are already quietly withdrawing in an attempt to maintain the better parts of town. Perfect!”
The future of unlikely places
On the other hand, this is also Kensington:

For these Philly librarians, drug tourists and overdose drills are part of the job
philly.com

image: Marc-Anthony Macon via Flickr/CC

(1136) Florida calls crisis

Urban studies theorist Richard Florida turns his attention in this item to the divergent prospects of inner suburbs and the sprawl beyond them.  Yikes!
Inside the new suburban crisis. Once the key driver of the American dream, the suburbs have reached the end of a long era of cheap growth. Now their advantages to economic mobility have nearly disappeared
citylab.com
image: houston, i am the problem via Flickr/CC

(989) Aging in place, kinda winging it

station wagon” …car-centric suburban neighbourhoods with multi-level homes and scarce sidewalks are a poor match for people who can’t climb stairs or drive a car.”
Here’s a feature that profiles a boomer-age man in a subdivision dating from what appears to date to the 1970s through 1990s.  Like millions of other people in the United States and Canada his mind is turning to the latter stages of life when such things as income and mobility go into decline as health and social services needs go up.  Such a great turning is bound to influence our communities in every possible way.  Some thought and planning has gone into this realigning of things but we get the feeling it isn’t yet enough.  This item does a very nice job of setting out the basic proposition with a brace of statistics and writerly turns of phrase.  Recommended reading.
Many boomers in denial over problems they face growing old in suburbs
miamiherald.com